Twins
#1
I have a friend that breeds. Their most recent litter produced an exceptionally small puppy. She said it was a twin. How does a set a twins work in the dog world and how common is it?
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#2
I'm not sure how that would work. Twins if identical in humans come from the same ferilised eggs and share the identical genetic material , non identical twins come from different fertilised eggs and do not share identical genetic material, since dogs produce multiple puppies from different eggs they are effectively non identical twins. I had very small pups sometimes from GSDs( mean only a third the size of their litter mates) and they always seemed to have a small placenta. I've put it down to poor nutrient in the uterus from implantation issue, placental or perhaps a late fertilisation or other factor. They sometimes had birth defects( cleft palate) and if memory serves me correct I think all of them were euthanised as they failed to thrive. They often showed developmental issues like a strange cry.
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#3
Apparently it can happen in dogs but is extremely rare and can only be confirmed by DNA testing. It is sometimes wrongly concluded that two pups may have shared a placenta because one placenta may have become tangled and ruptured during whelping. Apparently true twins from one egg splitting are unlikely to survive due to numerous complications. I read an article about surviving (DNA confirmed) twins in South Africa being delivered by C section and it was quite a big deal because it is so extraordinarily rare.

Runts are not uncommon and as jaceyd commented, can be as little as a third of the size. The canine uterus is like a V shape and the runt is most often positioned at the base of the V If their is any nutritional supply shortfall the pup at the base of the V will be the one to get the least and be unable to grow as big.

So basically, in the absence of DNA tests a pup cannot be said to be a twin from the splitting of one egg.

I could be wrong, this is just from the memory of my compulsive reading as an insomniac LOL not from personal experience.
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#4
The puppy's twin was dead in the same sack. Not identical. The surviving pup is very small. Her husband insists on keeping it so it may have special needs. This breeder has had enough litters over many years so it may be statistically possible?
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#5
WOW, it sure sounds like it may be one of those rare cases, the situation kind of ticks all the boxes doesn't it ? Sharing one sack, complications with one dying and then one far from robust. If they were true twins, as in one egg dividing, not just multiple birth, then they would have been genetically identical even though they may have appeared physically a little different.
I hope the little pup is OK and has quality of life, please keep us updated.
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#6
Trifan, The only difference between my experience and your memory is that runts usually came from the far ends of the horns, not the central location. In fact, the first pup born is the central pup and it is often the largest.
Gotta love 'em.
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#7
Gideon\s mom','index.php?page=Thread&postID=192080#post192080 Wrote:Trifan, The only difference between my experience and your memory is that runts usually came from the far ends of the horns, not the central location. In fact, the first pup born is the central pup and it is often the largest.

Thanks GM, that makes more sense, doesn't it.
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#8
Her name is BB adorable mini looking black tri. Getting spoiled rotten as breeders family pet along with a red and white adult male plays with part of a litter in last stages of training before going home from what I understand.
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#9
Tristan , GM yes the runts ,tended to be the last one or last but one born from the top of the horn . Often the first was a bruiser which was areal effort for the bitch
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#10
But having the bruiser while mom isn't worn out is better for mom, and the rest of the pups usually come easy after that.
Gotta love 'em.
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