car fear/motion sickness
#1
Posted this in the "new bit" and have had some good replies!

Just thought i'd repost with a title! Hope this is ok!






We have a 7 1/2 month old red and white border collie called Ruby who we got at 11 weeks.
She loves people and other dogs and just wants to be friends with everything and everyone (our cats and chickens included!) but not boisterous...
She's a sensitive little soul (like so many of them!) and looks for guidance in new environments- until she feels confident - then she's off!!! Frisbee_dog


All good! .......Our one (and only, so far! (minus the hoover Rolleyes !)) 'issue' is the car/van!!!!!!


? anxiety ? motion sickness ? fear of motion itself ? a mix up of all!


Initially excessively drooled on first journey in car and up to the age of 5 months - when this stopped ?? how or why?! - vomited maybe 3 or 4 times in the first month of having her but hasn't since.
She sits silent and appears shut down once in her bed and attempts to always rest her chin on something and on anything longer than around 45 minutes starts to yawn and "mouth slap".
She doesn't look at coat/shoes/lead/car keys with joy either!


So far have tried: treats, toys, sitting with her, other dogs in with her, feeding her meals in (not before travel obviously!), behaviour modification (no car for 2 weeks then a gradual build up with engine on/end of street, treats with lead and collar/ jacket and shoes etc etc). Adaptil, thunder jacket, rescue remedy, Cocculus, ginger biscuit, kong, varying positions, crate, (no crate!), 'through a dogs ear" music (which works great in the house!) and probably a few others that have escaped my memory!




I should add that all can go well if all the fun stuff is done each time (for a long time!!) and on the odd occasion she can jump in in less than a minute! But getting the lead on with a wagging tail, leaving the house and having a smooth transition from front door to car door and in and away on adventures is an experience we are still eagerly awaiting!!!


We have now got a behaviourist in who is devising a plan but before that we are trying to rule in/out for certain motion sickness and have Cerenia (anti nausea) for 2 days (although day 1 has proven not to show any definitive difference!).
Both the behaviourist and the vets we have seen feel it is an old wives tale that they grow out of it (adding to our depression!) although the fact she no longer has excessive drool is hope I am clinging on to!!!


Hoping to put feelers out there to pick up any hints/tips/ideas/experiences/(sympathy!) etc from those who understand and can relate to any of these issues??!!

Apologies for the very long rant (and if this is completely in a wrong thread!) Any advice and guidance appreciated!!!

Some days they just always seem 5 steps ahead of your 4!!
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#2
We had the same car issues with rambo until we started securing him in the car he does much better now that he has a limited range of motion and basically has to sit in one spot. We tie his leash around the center head rest in the back seat. He tried one of the side seats but he got whiny because he wanted to be able to see us both at the same time. If we go on a longer trip we give him the right amount to of benadryl for his weight and that seems to help. Now he is a happy car pup.


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#3
Ah Rambo looks happy to be adventuring! We live in hope ha ha! We have a harness belt which didn't go well the first time (she tried to chew it and pull it off!) but we may try again now sh'e a bit older. Thanks!
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#4
Don't give up it took 3 or 4 trips before we found how he felt most comfortable. The first 1 hour trip was basically vomit palusu.
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#5
Neither of mine like car rides, but Micah(my red and white) is the worst. He has to be crated and does best with a battery powered fan blowing directly on him. Both of them do better with the a/c blasting cold.
Gotta love 'em.
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#6
Hi, thanks for replies, yes perseverance perseverance!... We'll try the fan idea.
One day we might find that "thing" that helps her overcome this!
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#7
A lot of times, car sickness is due to what the dog sees not matching up with what the dog feels, so adding that wind in the face really helps. BTW, this also works with people who get carsick. Having to ride in the back was torture for my daughter. Since being old enough to ride in the front, she no longer has any carsickness issues.
Gotta love 'em.
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#8
It was a long drive from the rescue for my new chap. He drooled most of the time and threw up just as we were getting home 40 minutes later. Now he can barely make it 2 miles. I don't know whether he now automatically feels ill because of that initial negative experience when he was probably frightened as well.. At the moment we are having to use a standard dog bed in the back of the hatchback on a folded down rear seat. The bed sits towards the rear with the window hatch part sloping over. It's not ideal.. Going to experiment with him in the front once I have a proper restraint. I hope when he can see (well partly) what's going on and is next to me with a breeze on his face he will do better.
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#9
I was always slightly confused by the suggestions to not let the dog see out the windows. I have pretty bad motion sickness that only acts up when I'm NOT looking where I'm going (ie reading, looking through my purse - or even turning to talk to someone when a sudden turn or stop comes up). My mom got really good at warning me when my head was down for one reason or another.

Is it not the same way with dogs? I guess they wouldn't understand inertia though for it to be beneficial?
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#10
Watching this thread with interest. I read that it is best if the dog faces forwards and can see outside. Also to open each window a little. It equalises the pressure (something to do with the effect on their ears). He did seem a little better today.
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