to neuter or not to neuter
#11
Yup
When I met Draco at 11 months I took one look at him and said to his then owner, he was fixed really young wasn't he. He was fixed at 15wks yikes.
I have seen this look before. It is like they are stuck in the uglies. Unfortunately the vets here push for really early fixing. I feel strongly against fixing young. There is very credible evidence of the risks associated with that.
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#12
15 weeks?! YIKES! I've never heard that early!

I have no clue when Ember was fixed.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#13
Yes Ember
And he is a big boy, he tips in at 100lb.
It is standard practice here.
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#14
I can't believe neutering at 15weeks, it's absurd. From my own point of view I would always neuter if I wasn't going to breed from a dog, and I think you have to have good reason to do so. It seems bizarre that the vet profession advocate such early neutering knowing that there is a strong possibility of adverse effects.
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#15
In Australia 6 months is the standard practice however at RSPCA or rescues all dogs are done before being placed even if only 8 weeks old but I can understand their reasons. Many people are just not equipped to manage intact dogs and the accidental litters and BB's are a huge problem. They are thinking in terms of the bigger problem. In the Shire north of us it is actually mandatory at 6 months. Only breeders or those who can prove activity in a competition sport can get an exemption. Of course it is only supervised amongst those who do what everyone is supposed to do and register their dogs with council. There is a huge culture of not registering dogs and reckless production of pups.

When first looking for a breeder I came upon several who required you to sign a contract which included agreeing to spey/neuter at 6 months. I really thought Max would be OK at 14 months but no, I tell him he is my "pretty boy".
I intend to wait longer with Jasper and make the decision based on his development at the time. My concerns where I live is the risk of intention to escape. We have a lot of feral dogs and dingo's and when there is the scent of a bitch on the air all hell breaks loose. My Shepherd ripped the timber framing off the garage door trying to get out to a bitch and also scaled a 7ft fence, I caught him as he went over fortunately.

WOW Quirky 100lbs is a very big boy. Max has not grown overly big, in fact he is quite petite, it's just the lack of broadness and masculinity in his head that stands.
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#16
He is a BC x GSD
His mon being the BC. Getting him at 11months I never saw his mom. I have consider the possibility that she had a bit of Pyrenees in her, quite a common mix here.
The other option is just genetics
The GSD is a slower and longer in time growing breed and the BC is a quicker shorter in time growing breed.
So genetically he could have the fast growing genes of the BC and the longer growing genes of the GSD
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#17
Gideon\s mom','index.php?page=Thread&postID=193242#post193242 Wrote:Same with Gideon. The breeder was freakishly careful to make sure all dogs she produced were neutered early. I didn't know better back then, so he was neutered at 4 month and he just about has a greyhound head. When he greets someone, he just about turns himself inside out in puppy excitement. It took forever to get him to stop submissive wetting, and for some people he still will. He's higher in the rear than the front and has a bad hip. But he is wonderful with puppies and small children. He can coax kids that are afraid of dogs into petting him.
We got Dax spayed when she was around 7 months old. (sorry this post was originally about males but seems to be similar characteristics)
The reason I did it early and before her first season was because at the time I was living with my parents who had a male un-neutered dog who they dont really control very well, so I really didnt want the stress. And in that respect, I dont regret it.
However she has remained very much puppy like. When I walk with someone who has collies who arent spayed, they are much more mature in their behaviour.
She is also very submissive towards strangers yet at the same time always wants to say hi (or maybe just feels the complete need to go over and tell them they are in control), which I didnt realise may be a cause from early spay but reading your post GM maybe this is so?
Im all for neutering/spaying, but the next pup I have Im in a position to wait for their first season and after growth plates have formed.
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#18
Ellie, I think you raise a really valid point in respect to an individual dogs psychological state at the time of spey/neuter. I have read that timid or fearful dogs in particular do better when left to full maturity before altering. I think another 8 months with testosterone would have helped Max's confidence.
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#19
It is interesting to look at the emotional or psychological effects of early fixing. I have heard that a male fixed young can always be immature.
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#20
Around here, some rescues neuter at 8 weeks, before the puppy is allowed to go home.
Gotta love 'em.
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