Puppy feeding fiasco
#1
Back for more advice guys , 8 week old puppy nicknamed the fridge cos he wants to eat everything is doing his best to eat the older dogs food will it cause any harm ?
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#2
Feed them in a separate room or gate him off. Letting him even try to get to the older dog's food is the quickest way to build resource guarding in the older dog.

Also, if you are leaving food down throughout the day for "grazing", it's time to pick up the bowls and feed at specific time(s) of the day.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#3
Ember,'index.php?page=Thread&postID=193757#post193757 Wrote:Feed them in a separate room or gate him off. Letting him even try to get to the older dog's food is the quickest way to build resource guarding in the older dog.

Also, if you are leaving food down throughout the day for "grazing", it's time to pick up the bowls and feed at specific time(s) of the day.
The older dog won't eat unless she can see the pup she's keeping a watchful eye on him been trying to feed separately but the second he's out the kitchen he's straight into her bowl no issues with that she is letting him but I'm snatching him out the way before he gets to much but he's fast older dog is back to grazing don't want her going hungry because of greedy guts
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#4
Dogs weren't built to graze, honestly. They do much better on a schedule. She won't starve herself. It may take her a meal or three to realize that when the bowl is down that means eat now. I have two dogs in my house, one of which is VERY nosey about what the other dog gets. This builds stress and tension needlessly. By feeding on a schedule, I can control when and how fast the nosy dog eats - if Kairo gobbles down then bothers Ember, I add tennis balls into Kairo's bowl on the next meal. It slows her down and gives Ember time to finish.

I can't stress it enough - separate them. This is causing tension that BCs don't handle well.

If it helps the older dog, feed the younger one in a crate in the same room.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#5
Ember,'index.php?page=Thread&postID=193759#post193759 Wrote:Dogs weren't built to graze, honestly. They do much better on a schedule. She won't starve herself. It may take her a meal or three to realize that when the bowl is down that means eat now. I have two dogs in my house, one of which is VERY nosey about what the other dog gets. This builds stress and tension needlessly. By feeding on a schedule, I can control when and how fast the nosy dog eats - if Kairo gobbles down then bothers Ember, I add tennis balls into Kairo's bowl on the next meal. It slows her down and gives Ember time to finish.

I can't stress it enough - separate them. This is causing tension that BCs don't handle well.

If it helps the older dog, feed the younger one in a crate in the same room.
Good advice as always thank you
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#6
I'm with Ember on this, dogs are not meant to be grazers. I don't seperate mine by more than a metre or 2. Not going near the other dogs food is a lesson I like them to learn right from the beginning. Initially I seperate by just using a wire pen for a few weeks (I don't like feeding in crates) and then I remove the pen and supervise, ready to physically block the dog that might approach the other. When one finishes first and perhaps glances at the others food, this is when I step in with "leave it" and call that dog away to the next room and then treat for walking away from the other dog and it's food. I will keep the dog distracted with simple trick training for the few moments it takes for the other dog to finish. In no time at all it simply becomes habit to walk away when finished. I place a lot of importance in them learning that going near another dogs food is simply not what we do. I don't want to leave it to circumstance, as in they don't bother each other simply because they are still eating themselves. It is like teaching children their table manners and really takes very little time if you are consistent. These days and for quite some time I can just put their food down and leave them to it as I am confident each dog knows it's manners and will not bother the other.
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#7
Trifan,'index.php?page=Thread&postID=193762#post193762 Wrote:I'm with Ember on this, dogs are not meant to be grazers. I don't seperate mine by more than a metre or 2. Not going near the other dogs food is a lesson I like them to learn right from the beginning. Initially I seperate by just using a wire pen for a few weeks (I don't like feeding in crates) and then I remove the pen and supervise, ready to physically block the dog that might approach the other. When one finishes first and perhaps glances at the others food, this is when I step in with "leave it" and call that dog away to the next room and then treat for walking away from the other dog and it's food. I will keep the dog distracted with simple trick training for the few moments it takes for the other dog to finish. In no time at all it simply becomes habit to walk away when finished. I place a lot of importance in them learning that going near another dogs food is simply not what we do. I don't want to leave it to circumstance, as in they don't bother each other simply because they are still eating themselves. It is like teaching children their table manners and really takes very little time if you are consistent. These days and for quite some time I can just put their food down and leave them to it as I am confident each dog knows it's manners and will not bother the other.
Think I'll need to work on the rest of the family and reeducate them , they think it's "cute " when they eat from the same bowl problem is I'm not always at home to supervise what's going on during the day , when everyone else is there but I can see the potential for disaster in the coming months when he's no longer an 8 week old puppy , think he's got a taste for the adult food though ;(
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#8
The adult food isn't going to hurt him, it's just an inadequate formula for a puppies growing needs, particularly with respect to phosphorous which is needed for growing bones.
Yep, I understand your problem, it's hard if all in the family are not on the same page and being really consistent. Consistency is the key to all aspects of raising a pup. You are absolutely right. Skye may be very tolerant now with a young pup but the day will likely come when she decides he needs to learn the manners and boundaries the humans have failed to teach him. If Skye takes control of these lessons it will not be pretty.
It is real easy to take for granted the sweet nature of our dogs. We sometimes don't see just what they are capable of simply because they have never had a need to behave in a certain way. The humans have the opportunity to show leadership, teach manners and save Skye from ever feeling the need to get in touch with her darker side.
It's really easy to forget how incredibly smart they are, bad habits are learned just as easy as good habits. It's a lot harder to change or fix something than it is to just learn the right way from the start. Have a good chat with the family and help them realise how much in benefits their beloved dogs for all family members to be on the same page.
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#9
Trifan,'index.php?page=Thread&postID=193766#post193766 Wrote:The adult food isn't going to hurt him, it's just an inadequate formula for a puppies growing needs, particularly with respect to phosphorous which is needed for growing bones.
Yep, I understand your problem, it's hard if all in the family are not on the same page and being really consistent. Consistency is the key to all aspects of raising a pup. You are absolutely right. Skye may be very tolerant now with a young pup but the day will likely come when she decides he needs to learn the manners and boundaries the humans have failed to teach him. If Skye takes control of these lessons it will not be pretty.
It is real easy to take for granted the sweet nature of our dogs. We sometimes don't see just what they are capable of simply because they have never had a need to behave in a certain way. The humans have the opportunity to show leadership, teach manners and save Skye from ever feeling the need to get in touch with her darker side.
It's really easy to forget how incredibly smart they are, bad habits are learned just as easy as good habits. It's a lot harder to change or fix something than it is to just learn the right way from the start. Have a good chat with the family and help them realise how much in benefits their beloved dogs for all family members to be on the same page.
The plot thickens upon further " discussion " I've found out they have been letting them eat each other's food I would have thought that 16 and 18 year olds would know better guess I was wrong Banghead
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#10
Well, no I wouldn't really expect them to know better particularly if the dogs seem happy enough with that arrangement (for now). I mean we often don't learn until something goes wrong and then we say, "oh, I should have thought about that more". Skye is still a pup herself but as she matures and the little guy is also not recognised by her as a pup, things can change. You also never know what the future may hold in respect to other dogs being around. Learning to respect each others space particularly around food is a very valuable safeguard.

I got the shock of my life on Jaspers first day home. It wasn't an ideal day as I had a house full of stay over guests and 3 extra dogs. Max was accustomed to being alone most of the time so the other dogs were already addition enough for his sensitivities. While I was away picking Jasper up, my partner had given Max a pigs ear which he didn't eat but instead left it in a corner in the kitchen. It was nevertheless a high value item. Not knowing it was in the vicinity I put Jasper down on the floor and as he walked past the area where the pigs ear was, Max attacked him with no recognition of his puppy status at all. It really shocked me as Max is a sweet, sweet natured boy. Lesson learned by all in the household and a reminder that the sooner we taught Jasper his manners the better.

My friend often stays over with her dogs and feeding all 5 of them in the same vicinity with no dramas or anxiety gives us a weird pleasure LOL as it represents success in teaching manners and boundaries. It also shows us that each dog knows the humans have their backs (NOT to be mistaken as meaning the humans are Alpha).
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