Dog's with jobs
#1
Hi all, my apologies if I am repeating something that has already been covered but I did a quick search and couldn't find what I was looking for.

Having just read the post about BC's going from farm to homes (as is the case with our Dash), I wondered what everyone does in regards to jobs.
There's a lot of mention of them needing a job and I can completely understand because Dash is still ball mad and I think he believes at the minute still that collecting his balls and catching them is his job to do.

So what job do you give your dog to do, if he/she is not working?

Hope my question makes sense.

Thanks in advance.
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#2
Trick training and toy naming are both very good. You could also try agility or nosework (scent detection) if you have a club nearby.
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#3
So is it more a case of mental stimulation rather than something they actually do throughout the day of their own accord? If you know what I mean..
We have taught him the name of all of his toys and he does great with that.

I want to try agility but wasn't sure when to start, he is 12 months this week.
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#4
Exactly so!

At 12 months he should be old enough to be enrolled in an agility class. Just call before hand. Smile
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#5
12 month is old enough to start agility training. My dogs compete at agility and flyball.
[Image: 922e7bce-ce23-427a-94d6-5cf3b6563f6b.jpg]
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#6
Emotional support dog. Entertaining kids, trick training, personal trainer.
“If having a soul means being able to feel love and loyalty and gratitude, then animals are better off than a lot of humans.”
― 
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#7
Hi LrdDashington,

Our Josie is about 6 1/2 months old now. Around the 4 1/2 month old stage she was becoming a bit of a pest, digging BIG holes, suddenly not responding to commands and being down right cheeky! We started jogging with her along the beach- my husband, myself and Josie. It's only a slow pace so she's really just trotting along and we don't go for miles but since doing that her focus has really come back to us. It's like her 'job' is us all moving as a team, every 5-10 meters she flicks her eyes back to us to make sure we're sticking together. Since starting this she is so much more relaxed than she ever has been after playing fetch with a ball or frisbee, I think the rhythm helps. Also now when we take her places (ie. car trips to visit friends/family) she isn't so spooked by new places, as long a she knows where mum and dad are she's very relaxed. It might be that she's maturing but I really think the steady fmaily jogs has made a huge difference
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#8
You can assign your dog any task you like, but that does not mean s/he will think it's their job. BCs decide for themselves what their job is. You see it in the attitude they display when they are working. Play is with a high tail and a good bit of extra activity, sometimes goofiness. When they are working, they carry their tail low and are very serious, no extra movement, no distractions.

When mine started doing stockwork, they thought it was a really exciting game, but suddenly one day something clicked and they realized they weren't just running around sheep, but were actually accomplishing something. For some reason, Micah also thinks going on a walk is his job. On the way away from home, he is all business and makes sure I'm aware of every leaf that isn't where it was yesterday, every animal in every field, etc. On the way home, his job is done and you can see the transformation as it happens. It's like he is a completely different dog.
Gotta love 'em.
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#9
(03-14-2017, 06:30 PM)Gideons mom Wrote: You can assign your dog any task you like, but that does not mean s/he will think it's their job. BCs decide for themselves what their job is. You see it in the attitude they display when they are working. Play is with a high tail and a good bit of extra activity, sometimes goofiness. When they are working, they carry their tail low and are very serious, no extra movement, no distractions.
It definitely sounds like Dash is 'working' when he wants to play ball. He is completely oblivious to anything else around him when he has a ball and will drop it on your knee repeatedly for hours if you let him!
His impulse control training has helped a bit with that though.

I love the idea of being able to run with the dog but I can just imagine him criss-crossing in front of me and tripping me up every time he notices a new smell.
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#10
When you start running with a dog, you start in heel position until they understand what you are doing and what you need from them, then you can start giving more freedom of movement.
Gotta love 'em.
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