New puppy, old dog
#11
When I got Izzy, he was 9 weeks old. My dog Kaya was 14-1/2, and she had a reputation of not getting along with other dogs (often reactive with either adults or puppies). I was quite hesitant to get a pup with Kaya still around, but at the same time, there was a part of me that knew once Kaya was gone, I'd have an extremely difficult time bringing in another dog. So I took a chance and got Izzy.

I think in one sense I was fortunate because Kaya trusted me, and I had faith in her. When I brought Izzy home (carrying him in a tote bag), Kaya met us at the door. The first thing I did was to tell Kaya to step back, then I told her "I've got something for Kaya!" (code for 'wow, something special for you'). Then I took Izzy out of the tote and showed him to her. At first I was skeptical as to how she'd react, but I kept repeating, "This is for Kaya, you have a new puppy!". To my surprise, she had no reaction other than a look of, "Oh, that's it? Well, okay I guess". Once Izzy was allowed on the floor I told Kaya not to touch him, but did allow her to sniff him (first while I was holding him, then after he was on the floor). And again she was good, checking him out, then giving him space. Of course Izzy too had to be trained, once he was settled in and knew that this was his new home. He adored Kaya, looked at her like she was the mom he didn't have (he was separated from his mother when he was 2 weeks old) and he attempted to follow her absolutely everywhere. So I had to keep a constant eye on him and not allow him to pester her. Kaya was, after all, getting older, had aches and pains, and was less tolerable to being 'hounded' than some other dogs might be. Overall though, their introduction, and ultimate friendship, went quite well. By the time he was a few months old, I found that I was constantly the one having to correct Izzy, because he too was (is) a reactive dog, and when I'd take the two of them for walks together the least little thing could set him off. When Izzy did react to a sudden sound or other fright, his first instinct was to whip around and bite Kaya HARD right in the face. And yet she would never discipline him or react in any way, so I had to be the one to stop him, immediately. Funny, for such a reactive dog, Kaya proved to have an inordinate amount of patience with my little border collie.

Did the way I initially introduced Izzy to Kaya make a difference? I have no idea. I suspect it had more to do with Kaya's understanding of what she was and was not allowed to touch (or react to) and my being able to trust her. And I'll admit that introducing a puppy to a known reactive dog was certainly taking a chance. But in the end it worked out well.
[Image: 24b7da04-ebe3-44ee-81cc-608ab615b402_zps55051c6f.jpg][Image: 83de47f8-0fda-4b91-9e6d-a8f2fd0b85ce_zps484a4b86.jpg]



"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." ~ Will Rogers
Reply
#12
Thanks Izzysmom

Interesting. I do not have a no one is allowed to displine puppy rule, because they can become brats lol
All my dogs I trust to discipline appropriately. I don't tolerate bullying or pestering.

See May does like puppies and she has helped with baby chicks and helped with abandoned kittens.
My only concern is will he be too disruptive for her
It could be a godsend because she still wants a job her body just can't do that much physical exercise now.
Reply
#13
I don't know how multiple dog homes do it. My heart only has room for one and Vice versa. Yet if he is the type who would not want to share. (I will never know) I know when the time comes he loves me enough to share and to send me what I need from him once again from the other side as soon as I need it.
I thought of doing a puppy when he hits middle to slow down age. But now I think I would like to savor the ending bond just as much as the beginning. I like that only dogs is different from only children. And it can be similar to that one true love over and over again.
“If having a soul means being able to feel love and loyalty and gratitude, then animals are better off than a lot of humans.”
― 
Reply
#14
Keller-b-border,  I understand your feeling but for me it is different.  I need a dog in my life...always...and in order to do that I have to have at least two.  In December 2012 my Miniature Schnauzer died.  I had my GSD and really didn't know what kind of dog I wanted next.  I didn't want something as large as a GSD and as much as I loved my Miniature Schnauzer I knew I wasn't a terrier person so I didn't get another puppy right away.  My oldest daughter (an adult, living abroad) kept nagging me to get another puppy.  I told her I had time, my GSD was young and healthy, but she kept nagging.  In March of 2014 I put down a deposit for a puppy that is now my Tasha and my daughter stopped nagging.  Last November, my GSD died.  It was sudden and completely unexpected.  He went from what appeared to be a healthy nine year old to gone in a week and a half.  My daughter was right.  I don't think I would have made it through those first couple of months without Tasha and Mattie.

Quirkydog, I'm having issues with wanting a puppy too.  I knew that when my GSD was gone we would get another male GSD.  I didn't want a puppy when he was here because it didn't seem fair to bring in a male puppy that might get a bit bossy with the old boy.  But I thought my GSD would live at least another three years and the collies would be six years old before I had to think about a puppy.  So here I am and my family desperately wants a puppy and my collies are too young, I don't feel it is time for a puppy.  I may change my mind.  I am planning to visit a breeder in the next six months and they don't have lots of litters.  It is a difficult decision.  I think whatever you decide it will work out.  You are not an inexperienced dog owner and I think you could blend a puppy into the family.  You know your dog and you know what is best.  Trust your instincts.
Reply
#15
T&M
I have eexperienced this too.
I had a 12 year May, and 2 x 5 year boys, Draco and Carter a golden I had inherited 2 years previously from my daughter. I thought I wouldn't be getting another dog for a very long time. I like having 2.
I envisaged my boys getting old together. My Golden went from what appeared fine to developing a cough and put to sleep, in less than a week, he had cancer. I did not expect this. I am still devastated.
To be honest the Golden stole my heart.
I also had a GSD, we lost him 10 years ago he was 13. Such an amazing breed. I don't like where the breed has gone both mentally and physically, however I think I seeing signs it is recovering, I do think we will own another probably not the next dog.
Reply
#16
Quirkydog,

I'm so sorry about Carter.  It is always horrible when a dog dies but to have it happen so quickly gave me no chance to process that he was gone.  Even five months later I will still walk into the house after being gone for a few hours and find that my brain still thinks he will be there to meet me at the door and my heart is so disappointed when he isn't there.
Reply
#17
T&M
That is my experience too. I was in shock for a while, then I was angry, I have still not processed it. He has been a hard one for me. I don't know if it is because he was too young and so full of life.
I can honestly say if my heart ruled I would be getting another goofy Golden, but my head says way too risky in the health department.

In fact we have been discussing what we would like.
The Border Collie because it is true and tested for us, and it would be hard not to have a pure BC next to me.
Having a few friends with rough collies I have considered a "downgrade" to one
My hubby likes heelers, but I think they do not make good pets.
We even considered a kelpie
My husband's heart would be a GSD

Hmm lots of herders, lol
Reply
#18
(04-02-2017, 12:11 PM)Quirkydog Wrote: Thanks Izzysmom

Interesting.   I do not have a no one is allowed to displine puppy rule,  because they can become brats lol
All my dogs I trust to discipline appropriately. I don't tolerate bullying or pestering.

See May does like puppies and she has helped with baby chicks and helped with abandoned kittens.  
My only concern is will he be too disruptive for her
It could be a godsend because she still wants a job her body just can't do that much physical exercise now.

Oh, I didn't mean that I wouldn't allow Kaya to discipline Izzy; once I knew I could trust her with him, I was hoping she would put him in his place when he began pestering. But she let him get away with everything, so I had to constantly step in and teach Iz to leave her alone.

Only once did Kaya ever snap at Izzy, and that happened to be over a piece of popcorn. It landed on the floor between the two of them, they both saw it at once and (before I had time to react) Kaya was on top of Iz and was acting as if she was tearing him to shreds. (In truth, she was making horrific sounds and had him pinned down, but not a tooth was bared.) I got her off of him and Izzy was so terrified that he flew right onto the back of the sofa and stayed there trembling for about 15 minutes. 

He avoided Kaya for the next day, then the day after that .... right back to being her little shadow.  Rolleyes
[Image: 24b7da04-ebe3-44ee-81cc-608ab615b402_zps55051c6f.jpg][Image: 83de47f8-0fda-4b91-9e6d-a8f2fd0b85ce_zps484a4b86.jpg]



"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." ~ Will Rogers
Reply
#19
Hi
I recently brought a 10 week BC pupy into the house with 3 other dogs.  1 is a 13 year old Staffie, who has terminal cancer.  However, you would never know from looking at her as she is active and happy.  I knew I would hve to have a dog puppy, as Dooby (the Staffie) only really likes male dogs.  SHe has often in the past flirted with large male BCs.
From the first few minutes, Dooby told that pup in no uncertain terms that she was not having any trouble from him.   Her growl means business and Comet listened well and gave her space.
However, she has talen to him very well, she lies next to him, plays with him ( up to her capability), and shows him how to destroy the garden.    She seems to have become more like her old self.    I have even caught her flirting with Comet and she is seemingly disappointed that he does not yet know what to do about it...

I do have to watch that Comet does not try to bully her  or pester her, but no fear.  If she wants peace she is quite capable of following hm round the room threatening him with instant death if he does not settle - and he does!   She has not once nipped him, her threat is enough...

Of course, having the other 2 dogs helps as Comet can use up his excess play energy on them.

So basically, it depends on the pup and the old dog.  The pup needs to  be a balanced sort, that is well socialised with older dogs, and the older dog needs to know how to discipline the pup without hurting him or over-scaring him.   But it can work well, and even help the older dog.
Reply
#20
Thanks for the input. I also have a 7 yr old dog. My old girl May has always like other herders and has had many spend time with us. I often look after some of my friends Aussies pups and adults.
I think it is doable but my husband has said no, lol
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)