Clicker training
#1
Have any of you ever tried clicker training on your BC's?  I would really like to try this with my BC Jack.
Reply
#2
I'm pretty sure all of us CT LOL. What are your specific questions?
[Image: e5Qmm5.png]


Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
Reply
#3
(Yesterday, 07:42 AM)Ember Wrote: I'm pretty sure all of us CT LOL. What are your specific questions?

Well, my BC Jack is afraid of the clicker at this point when I click it.  He runs and hides under the table.  Is there a way to teach him that the clicker is nothing to be afraid of?  I really think he would do well this type of training if we could just past his fear of the sound.
Reply
#4
This is not uncommon for a sound sensitive breed like the Border Collie,
There is nothing "magical" about the clicker in itself, It is the use that has the "power".
I have seen the clicker misused so I would urge any one to educate themself about HOW clicker training works,
You have several options, Buy a"softer" sounding clicker, Be careful where your hands are for clicking, not directly near ears, so you could have your hands behind your back or something.
Use something else, remember their is nothing magical about the clicker, so you could use something else as a clicker.
I personally am more and more using my tongue to click, rather than the clicker.
But the click is my active marker, the click indicates to my dog this means movement and the click marks and ends the movement. I also use a verbal calm marker, this I usually use for duration training, like a chin rest.
Clicker training to me creates a thinking dog, that means I do not "help" or give my dog the answers it is about him trying things and working it out, I do not lure, I do not speak. I have to ensure my criterion are achievable, It is like a "dance"
My dogs absolutely love this way of training. I would always use this way in future I like the thinking, confident dog you get with this. It is also so much fun, especially when what you thought you taught was not, lol.
Like at the moment I am teaching Draco an official retrieve, by back chaining. During the hold I have accidentally paired it with backing up, too funny. It is all fixable. So I guess it creates a thinking owner too, lol
Reply
#5
^ What she said LOL.

Ember doesn't like the actual clicker. She will try it for a few tries or so and then you can see her ears start to pin back and then she starts trying to leave. We use a "Yes" marker instead. I want to try using my tongue too but haven't yet.

As QD said it's the concept that matters. You chose a sound that isn't made very often in your house (I can't use a clicking pen, which is a softer sound, because I use them often). Then you build a "contract" with your dog that this sound means a reward is coming.

This video is where I started out learning (I now subscribe to the channel). Clicker training itself is about half way through but some really good information all the way through.



[Image: e5Qmm5.png]


Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
Reply
#6
Before you start clicker training it is important to "charge your clicker" especially with a Border Collie. Here is an example on how to do that. 
http://www.wikihow.com/Charge-a-Clicker

I personally find it much easier to say yes or click my tongue than it is to hold and click a clicker. Treats, clicker, dog, too much for me.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

[Image: P1160337-800x600_zps7nxqmgvy.jpg]

Reply
#7
I agree, the clicker has no magical power and has no different training method in itself to a "yes" or tongue click. It's just a method of delivering a quick, consistent acknowledgement. I have used them and probably have 1/2 dozen around the house but seldom can put my hand on one for spontaneous, spur of the moment training. I find myself doing little training sessions here and there throughout the day and as I always have my voice with me I tend to just use "yes". I also prefer to have my hands free so I have one hand to quickly treat and another hand to use either signals or at times guide or help support the dog for more difficult tricks. When I teach them to peek-a-boo under something, I need one arm to offer as the thing I want them to put their front legs on and the other hand to hold a treat to lure them to peep under my arm. I think I am just not co-ordinated enough to have a clicker in hand as well.
Reply
#8
Gideon was afraid of the clicker, so I used a ball point pen for a while, but he does better with a word marker, so I use "Yes."
Gotta love 'em.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)