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#21
I have worked with Tasha on not jumping on people 20 time more then I ever did with my GSD.  The result?  Tasha doesn't jump on strangers, except children.  I guess children are just too cute and irresistible.  When we are at an agility trial I keep watch to keep my dogs away from other dogs, just good manners.  So if I am standing someplace talking to someone or checking results and from the corner of my eye see someone approaching without a dog I don't give it a thought.  I can always tell if it is a stranger or someone Tasha knows.  For a stranger, Tasha will sit nicely and wiggle her bottom in anticipation of getting attention.  For a friend she lunges forward and is up on her hind legs like a rearing horse except she wiggles and squirms to try to get near her "best friend".  And the person she is the worst with?  The puppy agility instructor that taught her not to jump on people (I guess that didn't translate well outside of class).
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#22
(04-27-2017, 11:07 PM)Tasha Wrote: I have worked with Tasha on not jumping on people 20 time more then I ever did with my GSD.  The result?  Tasha doesn't jump on strangers, except children.  I guess children are just too cute and irresistible.  When we are at an agility trial I keep watch to keep my dogs away from other dogs, just good manners.  So if I am standing someplace talking to someone or checking results and from the corner of my eye see someone approaching without a dog I don't give it a thought.  I can always tell if it is a stranger or someone Tasha knows.  For a stranger, Tasha will sit nicely and wiggle her bottom in anticipation of getting attention.  For a friend she lunges forward and is up on her hind legs like a rearing horse except she wiggles and squirms to try to get near her "best friend".  And the person she is the worst with?  The puppy agility instructor that taught her not to jump on people (I guess that didn't translate well outside of class).
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#23
I have noticed that our Border/Aussie tends to jump on people but our Border does not.  He will run up to folks to be petted but won't jump up.  I have noticed that the Border/Aussie is starting to jump up less.  I have asked guests to turn their back and not pay attention with giving pets if she jumps up and since she hates not being paid attention to she stops the behaviour.  I think it is excitability in her reaction.  She seems to be getting better.  Our GDS' did not jump on guests but would bark and we would have to reassure them that it was okay so they would stop.  You can imagine how intimating two GSDs barking in a house was.  Very protective dogs!
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#24
When we adopted Mattie it only took her a few days to know my GSDs  (Remus) warning bark from his "Dad is home" bark.  If Remus gave a warning bark Mattie would run away as fast as possible and hide.  If Remus gave his "Dad is home" bark Mattie would run to the front door and hop around and bark happily.  I have a FedEX guy that has GSDs so he wasn't afraid of my dog's bark.  The UPS guy wasn't so fortunate.  One day Remus started barking and I thought it was my husband returning home from work.  I went to the front door and started to open it and something in the back of my brain said, "grab his collar", so I reached down and held on to Remus' collar.  Thank goodness I did because it wasn't my husband but the UPS guy.  My dog barked and lunged and looked rather threatening (he wasn't super aggressive, just would have pinned the guy up against the truck but the poor guy didn't know that) and I yelled, "Hi, give me a minute" and put my dog in the laundry room.  After that my kids reported to me that the UPS guy would tip toe up to our door and gently place the package on the doorstep, ring the bell, and run like mad to the truck.  I always felt bad for that but at the same time it let me know that I did know subconsciously the difference in my dog's barks.
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