HELP
#1
Does anyone have a tried and true (dog friendly) weed/grass killer they can share? 

I have tried a few home remedies this year but they haven't worked so well. Vinegar and salt was the best so far but only managed to make the grass/weeds wilt for a few days. Now they are laughing at me. I'll give them until Monday before I try something else. Maybe they will croak in the mean time.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#2
At the end of the day there is no home remedy that works as well as the chemical glyphosate, (roundup etc). My partner is knowledgable will such things as he is a horticulturist and green keeper. We had to use glyphosate a few days ago in area's that the dogs can access. He keeps the dogs away until the product is dry on the plant/weed. The active ingredient is is mostly absorbed into the plant within 2 hours. It works by going to the roots and preventing the uptake of moisture, hence the plant dyes. Not saying I like using these products and I do believe there are those who have a reaction to the surfactant that makes the active chemical stick to plants however the nasty weed "cobblers peg" and BC's are a really bad combination.
In his job they are now using pine oil. This came about after public pressure to stop the use of glyphosate. The pine oil does work for sure. It is however more expensive to purchase and much more time consuming to apply as it cannot just be blanket sprayed over weed patches but instead must be applied to individual weeds ensuring full and thorough coverage of the weed.

When it comes to weed poisoning it seems to be a damned if you do and damned if you don't dilemma. We will continue to use glyphosate based products for now and the important thing is to follow directions accurately and take sensible precautions.

A story about a local woman who claims to be highly allergic to glyphosate. In our small town she is known as "canary woman", a spin off from the old days when canaries were put down mine shafts to check gas levels. She is the spearhead of the anti-chemical movement and claims that glyphosate used within 1 kilometre of her will kill her. She stalks the council workers measuring how close they come to town and writes several letters a month to council. She must be notified of any planned spraying within a kilometre of her residence in town.
A few years ago a notice was sent out specifying a date for spraying. She rounded up volunteers for a weeding day so she could make the spraying unnecessary. No problem if that is what she wanted to do. Citizens/public can use glyphosate to their hearts content, the ban is only on the trained professionals LOL. My partner came home one day and was so stressed. He had seen the proprietor of a business adjoining the park, spray his property line and also come into the park and spray the whole area that he knew "canary woman" planned to hand weed with the volunteers the next day. The sand area in the park that was overtaken by grass and weeds had been completely covered with glyphosate by a well meaning citizen. The following day "canary woman" spent 5 hours with her friends weeding out all the poisoned grass and weeds with bare hands. Guess what ? " Canary women" had no reaction whatsoever !!! I absolutely guarantee that if she had known she would have ended up being taken away in an ambulance after she worked herself up to all her psychologically induced symptoms.
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#3
I have used Round Up in the past on the fence line. I really don't like putting that stuff into the air or soil. Unless you have an army willing to pull weeds for days without using it we will have to spend as many hours trimming. 

I'm going to look closer at the area I sprayed with vinegar and salt later today and see what is dying. Then I'll have to decide to use Round Up or not. 

Why is it grass grows where we don't want it but in areas you hope it will grow it doesn't?  Huh
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#4
We don't like using chemicals on our yard either. This year it really shows. Thinking about breaking down and hiring a lawn service and then heading out of town when they show up. We did that a few years ago and our yard looked like a golf course. I tried vinegar, sea salt and Dawn dish soap once. Turns out it's a vegetation killer. Not just weeds. Undecided
Lord, help me to be the kind of person my dogs think I am.
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#5
I don't know about sea salt but the iodized salt sterilizes the soil so nothing will grow again. 

After taking a closer look at where I sprayed the vinegar and salt I have to say it is a fail. The tops of the weeds and grass wilted and turned brown but have continued to grow. 
So it's back to using the Round Up for now at least.  Undecided
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#6
OB. You raise a valid concern that is a consequence if chemical miss-use. Herbicides should never be used in such a way that they can put a mist into the air but in any event they are a heavy molecule and will not remain in the air. These chemicals can be used by any Joe yet few know "how" they work or how they should be dispersed to mitigate problems. The active ingredient is neutralised as soon as it comes in contact with clay particles, so that which does not land on actual foliage is rendered inert. If there has been no rain and foliage becomes coated with dust from that which is thrown up by cars along road sides, the chemical is neutralised when it reaches the foliage and it can't be absorbed by the plant/weed. It does not work by acting directly on the foliage or by being taken up from the earth. It works by being absorbed by the plant, taken to the roots, where moisture and nutrient uptake is inhibited.

Greg. Yes you are likely to do more damage to the earth and the plants, both initially and residual by using such things as salt and detergents (don't have the facts on vinegar in the soil) because they are changing the very composition and PH of the soil and to some degree permanently. If you were to use these things continually you will eventually render the soil dead and unable to support most organisms and most plant except the most hardy which unfortunately is often the very weeds you wanted to get rid of.

Don't get me wrong, I am not supporting or promoting the random and regular use of chemicals and always on the alert for alternatives but at times weed control measures are just a necessary evil. Facts rather than hearsay enable me to choose the safest method, take the appropriate safety precautions for me and cause the least damage to the soil. I gotta say, hell would freeze over before I put copious amounts of sodium in particular, into my soil. Just sharing the knowledge and "facts" presented by someone who has a full understanding of how these things work and how they should be used. You can potentially be causing more damage to the earth and ground water (possibly of a permanent nature) by using things like salt, vinegar and detergents. The very composition and characteristics of the soil i.e.: alkalinity, PH etc, ect, can be changed , often permanently.
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#7
We hate using round up too but as said before its safe after 2 hours of dry time we keep the dogs in till then. I am getting too old to weed wack every thing weekly so now I round up under fence around house and storm drains and such but still weed wack the garden boxes
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