Fighting BCs
#11
I had a similar situation with my boys. Once Jasper reached 6 months Max no longer recognised him as being a puppy and no competition. If Max was snuggled up with me and Jasper approached, it was on. He was starting to resource guard but I managed to nip it in the bud. As soon as Max started to get snarky I would immediately get up and walk away from him, completely ignoring him, not even a glance.

It honestly only took 1/2 doz times before Max realised that if he carried on like that he was going to lose the resource. As soon as he remained non-reactive upon Jaspers approach he got high praise and his favourite spot given the best of attention. It swung from Jasper being wary of coming near me if Max was with me to me being able to have one on each side of me with their heads on my lap.

The guarding only really occurred when Max was enjoying one on one (affection/physical) time with me, it did not happen when we were all involved in other activities together and Max was not bothered if Jasper approached me for attention as long as his time with me was not being interrupted.

If your girls have been doing this for a while then it will of course take longer to turn it around. It's just so important that the aggressive behaviour ALWAYS results in the offending dog losing your attention and any focus at all.

Ideally, by being aware and prepared you can get up and walk away as soon as the guarding dog looks to be even thinking about action rather than starting to act out. This is a very powerful moment, the dog gets the message and does so before pushed to threshold where retrieving the situation is difficult. Staging situations and setting them up for the scenario you want to work with is the best way to practice, stay one step ahead and have control.
Reply
#12
Nicely said Trifan
Also good info on whether it is just over you or whether a bigger issue.
My dogs are never allowed to claim me, May certainly would have gone the route, lol. But I see her trying to get eye contact or stillness and I usually remind her it is not acceptable, if that did not work which it always did probably because like you say it was caught early she would have lost her privilege of being next to me. I would add be aware of a dog using height as well in this situation.
Reply
#13
(05-18-2017, 05:44 AM)Trifan Wrote: I had a similar situation with my boys. Once Jasper reached 6 months Max no longer recognised him as being a puppy and no competition. If Max was snuggled up with me and Jasper approached, it was on. He was starting to resource guard but I managed to nip it in the bud. As soon as Max started to get snarky I would immediately get up and walk away from him, completely ignoring him, not even a glance.

It honestly only took 1/2 doz times before Max realised that if he carried on like that he was going to lose the resource. As soon as he remained non-reactive upon Jaspers approach he got high praise and his favourite spot given the best of attention. It swung from Jasper being wary of coming near me if Max was with me to me being able to have one on each side of me with their heads on my lap.

The guarding only really occurred when Max was enjoying one on one (affection/physical) time with me, it did not happen when we were all involved in other activities together and Max was not bothered if Jasper approached me for attention as long as his time with me was not being interrupted.

If your girls have been doing this for a while then it will of course take longer to turn it around. It's just so important that the aggressive behaviour ALWAYS results in the offending dog losing your attention and any focus at all.

Ideally, by being aware and prepared you can get up and walk away as soon as the guarding dog looks to be even thinking about action rather than starting to act out. This is a very powerful moment, the dog gets the message and does so before pushed to threshold where retrieving the situation is difficult. Staging situations and setting them up for the scenario you want to work with is the best way to practice, stay one step ahead and have control.

Thank you Trifan, this is great feedback.

BTW for the people who run this site, I tried looking for dedicated topics on this website and couldn't find them.
Reply
#14
OK this just got a whole lot more serious

They just fought and I got a bad bite and am at the GP

I saw it all this time, up front

It's not what I thought

The younger one attacked the older one twice

I was told by a dog expert two years ago what might happen is one day the younger one will grow up and challenge the older one for supremacy and I think that's what's happening

They've had five fights in 9 days, note it's always when we are home and always within one yard of one of us humans - well I assume it's always when we are home as there's never any blood and I assume if they fight on their own blood would eventually be drawn

What do I do?? This is freaking me out and I can't keep getting my hand bitten

Is this just how it is? Do I have to let the girls sought out BTW them both whose top dog and then life just goes on? That's what I have been told , been told that the younger one will supersede the older one
Reply
#15
Sorry to hear this... I don't think that there's a hierarchy in the pet world at least not in the way we think. I doubt this is just a fight for power and from what I've heard these sorts of problems don't resolve easily. Honestly I'm no expert but from what I've heard I would do one of two things, find a good behaviorist and have a good long talk to find out the best strategy to tackle this or consider rehoming. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, hopefully I'm wrong and someone knows something better. I wish you the best of luck.
[Image: 2017-01-25%2008.55.54_zps4pg1dz33.jpg]
Sometimes, the smallest things bring the greatest joy.
Reply
#16
(05-18-2017, 08:31 PM)Loyal Border Wrote: Sorry to hear this... I don't think that there's a hierarchy in the pet world at least not in the way we think. I doubt this is just a fight for power and from what I've heard these sorts of problems don't resolve easily. Honestly I'm no expert but from what I've heard I would do one of two things, find a good behaviorist and have a good long talk to find out the best strategy to tackle this or consider rehoming. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, hopefully I'm wrong and someone knows something better. I wish you the best of luck.

Thanks,  just Met with a dog behavioural expert and she said the same thing 
She is coming over in a week to see the dogs at home 
She thinks twelve months oF hard work and no guarantee buy good to get onto it early

SAid to separate the dogs while the humans are home 

Said little oNE is going through social maturity and nearing two years of age and during such time is on edge more  and as she is growing up she's decided sHe's now longer taking Maddie's bullying So is fighting back
Reply
#17
Had to get a tetnus shot, that's me not dogs!!
Reply
#18
Sorry that this has escalated and hope the behaviourist can help resolve this.
Bitch on bitch is truly the most difficult to resolve.
With my girl dogs, there have been other girls that would not be accepted, others were.
My friend who breeds Aussies has several girls at any given time. I remember one of her old girls died and all hell let loose amongst the remaining girls because of the change in the dynamics, I am talking several vet visits and stitches, it was between two of the girls but when it started the other girls would jump in.
She is a very experienced dog person, sadly she had no option but to rehome one of the girls, as it was not possible for her to keep them permanently separated.
Our thoughts are with you
Reply
#19
(05-16-2017, 04:43 PM)Ember Wrote: Have you looked into finding an R+ behaviorist?

Just an FYI, I had Kairo and Ember here and never saw a "hierarchy". If they fought it was because one was getting on the other's nerves - Kairo was pushy but Ember knew what she did and didn't like and set Kairo right every time. But Kairo was the more outgoing one and the instigator.

One thing I would look for is if blood is being drawn.

Start a journal and journal each and every instance that happens. Find out what is the underlying issue (spacial breaching, warning signals being ignored / boundaries being pushed, possessive behaviors, etc). All of this will tell you something.

And please please please try to find a behaviorist.

 When your Dogs fought did you break them up?  You say EMber set Kairo straight,  so was that with a fight she won? 

I Think you're right though,  it's about social setting not hierarchy so much 

Although the two things are kind of similar,  I mean Maddie bullies Murphy when she gets too friendly with the humans. So that's sort of like a hierarchy is being set.  

BUT Murphy is not tolerating it anymore,  which is very much her right
Reply
#20
(05-18-2017, 09:24 PM)Quirkydog Wrote: Sorry that this has escalated and hope the behaviourist can help resolve this.
Bitch on bitch is truly the most difficult to resolve.
With my girl dogs, there have been other girls that would not be accepted, others were.
My friend who breeds Aussies has several girls at any given time.   I remember one of her old girls died and all hell let loose amongst the remaining girls because of the change in the dynamics,   I am talking several vet visits and stitches, it was between two of the girls but when it started the other girls would jump in.
She is a very experienced dog person, sadly she had no option but to rehome one of the girls, as it was not possible for her to keep them permanently separated.
Our thoughts are with you


Thing is the get along 99% of time but that 1% damage can be catastrophic 

When I got home after the GP and seeing dog behavioural expert my wife was in backyard playing ball with the girls together,  all very chummy
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)