Fighting BCs
#31
Behavioural expert said Murphy is not confident around Maddie because Maddie bullies her, protecting her resource (us humans). So I expect the expert will try and change Maddie's behaviour slowly so Murphy doesn't feel threatened in the future and then won't attack Maddie
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#32
Done a lot of research and seems there are different views on hierarchy vs social setting and whether two females are worse than two makes or one of each
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#33
(05-19-2017, 03:06 PM)Quirkydog Wrote: Let's be honest girls,  
We don't let it go and that is why if girls fall out it is tricky, I am serious.
Boys can have a disagreement and they move on. It is dealt with.   It is interspecies .

Haha, this is so true. Yesterday the boys broke into a fight, not sure over what as they were in the lounge alone. I intervened verbally and it came to an end but with Jasper trying to have the last word. Typical adolescent LOL. Max retreated to his crate of his own volition but Jasper went to the crate door, standing tall and eyeballing. I stepped in front of him, backed him up, told him "leave it" and asked him to sit. Hah, next thing Max comes around the side of me and goes straight for Jasper, full of appeasement body language and is all kiss, kiss to Jasper who then reciprocated. Released Jasper verbally and off they went like a pair of love birds.
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#34
True Trifan, my boys would have the occasional spat, there was no posturing leading up to it, it was quick and dealt with. Girls, yikes, the posturing and grudges.
By the way My workplace has one other female all the rest guys. It's great, lol

All jokes aside I would agree that hierarchy is NOT outright it is fluid. With some things like resources I don't think hierarchy has much if anything to do with it.

One thing I would like to add is that very often the "victim" is the "perpetrator"
Basically the perceived "perpetrator" has had enough and has often tried to avoid conflict with no success.
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#35
The theories about hierarchy came from limited observation and loads of assumptions about wolf packs. They have since had many hundreds of hours more direct observation and better understanding of behavior and body language. They have discovered that dominance is fluid and changes according to circumstances and that a lot of behavior that they were calling dominance was a misreading of body language.

Also, they assumed that dogs could not relate to humans in any way except to think that we were just big dogs and so we had to act like members of a dog pack. They have since realized that dogs are more intelligent and flexible in their thinking than that and that we automatically do many things to "bring them into our world" that would totally baffle them on every level, if they couldn't see us as "not dogs" yet they love and thrive under our care.
Gotta love 'em.
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#36
Does anyone know what I should do with my girls? Anyone here have that level of knowledgeable
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#37
This needs hands on help. Do you feel comfortable and confident in the behaviourist? This is the way forward. I do feel for you and realize this must be a desperate and heartbreaking situation.
Where are you?
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#38
I agree with Quirky. It's not a matter of members having the knowledge to help you or not, it's more a matter of those with such knowledge knowing the limitations of helping without first observing the dogs. There is only so much help that can be offered online and to attempt to do otherwise would demonstrate a lack of knowledge. Dogs and their humans are not like inanimate objects whereby one can simply say , "remove part A and move part B. It is a very individual situation that needs so many factors taken into consideration. A hands on trainer/behaviourist is the only way forward other than considering re-homing. Many members really do understand and empathise but can only offer limited, general advice and share our own experiences. It's not a minor training issue where there is room for trial and error. Error may make things worse for you.
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#39
(05-20-2017, 11:52 PM)Quirkydog Wrote: This needs hands on help.  Do you feel comfortable and confident in the behaviourist?   This is the way forward.    I do feel for you and realize this must be a desperate and heartbreaking situation.  
Where are you?


Melbourne 

YeS seeing dog behavioural expert Fri and see how we go
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#40
(05-21-2017, 12:26 PM)Trifan Wrote: I agree with Quirky. It's not a matter of members having the knowledge to help you or not, it's more a matter of those with such knowledge knowing the limitations of helping without first observing the dogs. There is only so much help that can be offered online and to attempt to do otherwise would demonstrate a lack of knowledge. Dogs and their humans are not like inanimate objects whereby one can simply say , "remove part A and move part B. It is a very individual situation that needs so many factors taken into consideration. A hands on trainer/behaviourist is the only way forward other than considering re-homing. Many members really do understand and empathise but can only offer limited, general advice and share our own experiences. It's not a minor training issue where there is room for trial and error. Error may make things worse for you.


Yes totally aware it needs professional help and that's the plan 

Just hope that works!
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