How is the Weather?
#31
Today was cooler.  The morning started out cloudy and 96F/36C.  My husband needed to check the irrigation lines and make sure everything was working and I went out to help.  We ended up spending three hours pulling weeds and trimming plants.  There was a slight breeze and still cloudy so it was hot but not miserable.  When we quit it was 105F/41C but still cloudy so not too bad.  At one point our neighbor came out and commented that it was nice to have cooler temperatures but the humidity was horrible.  I didn't even notice the humidity and when I went inside checked the humidity and it was at 17%.  I guess my neighbor has never lived in the mid-west or the south! By the way, I try to keep my home around 25-30% humidity to keep everyone's sinuses from bothering them, keep my son from getting nosebleeds, and keep my daughter's violin in tune.
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#32
I hear the dry heat feels and behaves completely different. Because of our daily thunderstorms we stay well above 50% humidity.

This forecast is cooler by 20% (I woke up Friday to it already being 90F), as we had a really decent storm blow through over night. Definitely lower than yours all the way around, TMM, but with the humidity and 0 wind, it feels very very icky. The shade isn't much better than the direct sunlight.


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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#33
90% humidity!! I need to tell my neighbor not to be a wimp!

Dry heat is better up to a point. Once you get past 108F it really doesn't matter anymore, it is just too hot!
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#34
I believe that! No rain today, and we are at 88F and 61%. That's low for us. I love to hear about all the different kinds of weather! And the funny thing is I can't get my dog to "mind" the heat at all. She would rather stay outside (one day it was above 100 and she just kept trying to take me down other paths instead of going right back home). And she still runs from water bowls outside. Will NOT drink.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#35
That must be really stressful that Ember won't drink. My two are too hyper in the heat but at least they will drink lots of water and take breaks in the shade. We had a rainstorm today, it only lasted about 20 minutes but it was like we were having a hurricane! And then it stopped. Typical weather in the desert.
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#36
(07-11-2017, 07:28 PM)Tasha Wrote: That must be really stressful that Ember won't drink.  My two are too hyper in the heat but at least they will drink lots of water and take breaks in the shade.  We had a rainstorm today, it only lasted about 20 minutes but it was like we were having a hurricane!  And then it stopped.  Typical weather in the desert.

Do you also get really cold weather in the desert where you live. My partner suffered hypothermia once when we were in the desert in approx the middle of the continent. We traveled right around Aus on an off road motorcycle, we went south first while we had warm gear and then up the west coast. We posted our warmer gear back home so we were light weight for the serious off road stuff in the top end, BIG MISTAKE. Then we came back down the middle into the desert and almost froze, Hmm never thought about it being so cold where it also gets the hottest. I could tuck in behind my partner but he copped the full brunt and got really unwell. It was very scary as we were hundreds of kilometres from even the nearest roadhouse and I couldn't even keep him upright on the back if I rode the bike. Of course we cracked out the emergency blanket, you know those thin silver things like a potato crisp packet. He recovered but for the next few days until we got out of the desert sleeping was hilarious. Two people spooned under one crunchy blanket, we had to wake each other up to do a synchronised roll over in order to not let much warm air out. Do you also get the opposite extreme where you live.
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#37
Trifan, our coldest is in December and January when our average low is 34F/1C. Winter is generally mild and if the sun is out and it isn't windy it feels warm until the sun goes down. The average high temperatures for December and January is 58F/14C. My daughter doesn't own a winter coat. When she outgrew the last one I realized we are the same size and I have lots of spare coats from living in colder climates. We usually wear polar fleece jackets or hoodies in the winter. I can see how people could get caught unprepared when it is warm enough during the day to be in a t-shirt and then temperature drops to almost freezing once the sun goes down.
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#38
We almost always have very high humidity, like in the high 90s. In the winter when it goes down for a few weeks, 60-70%, it's considered low and very dry. Our temps right now are high 90s and the heat index has us at 110+. We mostly stay in during the day, maybe 10-20 minutes of outdoor work before coming in to cool off. With the humidity this high, you cannot cool off outside, not even in the shade.
Gotta love 'em.
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#39
(07-14-2017, 11:38 AM)Gideon Wrote: We almost always have very high humidity, like in the high 90s.  In the winter when it goes down for a few weeks, 60-70%, it's considered low and very dry.  Our temps right now are high 90s and the heat index has us at 110+.  We mostly stay in during the day, maybe 10-20 minutes of outdoor work before coming in to cool off.  With the humidity this high, you cannot cool off outside, not even in the shade.

Humidity is a huge factor in how it feels outside.  When my husband and I were out over the weekend doing yard work and the humidity was around 5% we were able to stay out until the temperature hit 105F.  We have had some rain the past few days and the humidity has been at about 50% and when it hits 90-95F it is miserable!  I remember living in the mid-west and would wake up in the morning and look outside and the humidity was so high that it looked foggy outside.
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#40
I grew up in southern California, LA, and the temps are the same as here in central Florida. But there you can stay out and do stuff pretty much all day during the summer. Here, it's 15 or 20 minutes and go inside to cool off. The only difference is the humidity. If your sweat doesn't evaporate, you build up internal heat.
Gotta love 'em.
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