Walking Manners?
#11
That is a REALLY interesting video.  Very thought-provoking.  Thank you for sharing it.

I've never thought about the 'Emotional Bank Account' with dogs before.  And I really like the reliance on body language rather than voice.

I would find it challenging to walk with a dog like that, because I always want to be on to the next thing, or Making Something Happen.   Rolleyes
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#12
interesting video. i can see how it works with her small dog when she can keep pace with him whilst keeping the lead loose, but how would it work with a BC/bigger dog? i know for sure that if Dax were going her pace its a trot and id have to jog to keep up. and she started with a 20ft lead- what would you do if they were always at the end of it- in terms of training them to stay close to you on pavement and not to go into road and you being far away from them etc?
sorry, question overload. im not so informed on all this, want to learn a bit more
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#13
Ember is a tracker, so our pace was very stop and go and thoughtful. I suppose it depends on the dog! The facebook page is open so you can probably ask your questions there Smile. At one point Ember did get a quick pace going and I found it easy to keep up with - more of a power walk. And I remember her saying somewhere (in the video or the description) that redirection sometimes is necessary, such as a busy road. I'm in an area that does have a busy road but Ember hasn't decided to go near it yet, opting instead to just circle in and out of the buildings in our complex.

If I were to do this with Kairo (husky-neice I've kept on and off), I'm sure the results would be very different. I'm thinking of it more as a training tool, and as with all tools, it might not fit every dog. Not sure! I just like what it does for Ember at the very least Smile

We had much less marking behaviors, which I also learned lately is a sign of stress.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#14
I love your observations and that you let the walk be about her outing. I think you have come to some great realisations. The stair wells and breezeways don't surprise me at all. These are areas of high concentration in respect to scents, fennels of foot traffic and funnels of scent on the breeze, so much information to process.
Much to the horror of one friend in particular who is into obedience and control, this is how I walk my dogs. The boys are well aware of my presence and often check in. Max in particular will self correct if the leash tightens and do a circle and come back in along side before setting off again. My friend is of the mindset that a dog should never walk in front of you, only beside or behind, yep DT nonsense. We both track our dogs and to be honest I do way better at it because I understand my dogs body language. Many a judge has commented, "this handler trusts the dog".
Maybe you could look for a tracking club in your area, it does so much for a dogs confidence. They really seem to know how much trust you are putting in them. It seems to be a big sport in the US, I followed a US tracking FB page for a while. It is a winter sport and most clubs hold workshops before the season starts. It is different to scent work in that they are not searching for a given scent but instead maintaining focus and following a given scent. I think it would be a great activity for both of you.

EDIT I should clarify that this is not how they walk in high traffic areas such as open air markets etc. They seem to have learned just from experience that we just move forward. I still let them be out front but they are very sensitive to direction from the leash, not pulling or tugging at them, just moving leash to left or right slightly. They check in often in busy places, it makes me smile, it's like, "are we doing good ? "
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