Going to see a rescue dog tomorrow - wish me luck...
#11
Dogs commonly get diarrhea in rescue. It's very stressful and they not only abruptly get their food changed on arrival, but it may suddenly change at any time they are there based on what people donate.


He sounds like a great dog, pup really.
Gotta love 'em.
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#12
Still keeping my fingers crossed for you.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

[Image: P1160337-800x600_zps7nxqmgvy.jpg]

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#13
(07-14-2017, 04:15 PM)only-borders Wrote: Still keeping my fingers crossed for you.

Thank you!

When I first met him last Thursday I spend 30 minutes one-on-one with him.  This morning I took him out for 1.5 hours, and it was a bit of a reality check.  He's still pretty stressed in the kennels - lots of panting, trembling and very alert.  When I took him past a fence with several dogs barking territorially behind it, he got very agitated and lunged towards the fence (he couldn't see them).  Other than that, when he's pulled towards other dogs in the grounds of the kennels it's been in what feels like 'I want to play' mode.

I'm slightly in two minds.  On the one hand, I do think he's probably a good young dog and I suspect he's got lots of potential.  On the other, I worry that he might be too much for this first-time owner.  I was very honest about this with the rescue, and they do know my history as I had my previous 'failed' rescue from them.  Their view is that he is a good dog and they'd be happy for me to have him (but then they have only had him for 4 days so they don't know him well).  I don't get the impression that they are trying to palm him off on me - they are a border collie specialist rescue called 'The Border Collie Trust', which seems to have a good reputation.

Just to complicate the picture: I've deliberately not booked any work in for the next four weeks, in order to give a dog the chance to settle in with me around all the time.  Unfortunately, after those four weeks I will be away for 2-3 days each week until November.  The very experienced dog-sitter who I was counting on has a long term health condition which has flared up so she won't be available.  One of my friends, who has had dogs all his life, says 4 weeks isn't enough time for the dog to settle in before putting him with a home boarder.

Sorry for the length of this post.  I guess I'm thinking out loud, but any thoughts/insights would be most welcome.  And please feel free to be honest - I very much appreciate the amount of experience on this board.

Thanks again for everyone's interest and support!
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#14
I agree with your friend completely. I personally wouldn't even entertain the idea of such an arrangement no matter how experienced the sitter or home boarder is. If employment caused this to be absolutely necessary I might consider it with my two year old who has been with me since 8 weeks but with my twelve month old who has also been with me since 8 weeks, I wouldn't do it no matter how good the sitter was. These are his formative years and consistency is important with any dog let alone a pup who has already gone through an upheaval.
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#15
I've just seen "zap" on the collie trust page he definitely has potential he's a good looking boy
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#16
(07-15-2017, 12:40 PM)Trifan Wrote: I agree with your friend completely. I personally wouldn't even entertain the idea of such an arrangement no matter how experienced the sitter or home boarder is. If employment caused this to be absolutely necessary I might consider it with my two year old who has been with me since 8 weeks but with my twelve month old who has also been with me since 8 weeks, I wouldn't do it no matter how good the sitter was. These are his formative years and consistency is important with any dog let alone a pup who has already gone through an upheaval.

Thank you for your honest and direct reply Trifan - I really appreciate it.  Despite all my research over the last 2 years, I hadn't appreciated that it would take more than a month or so for a dog to be relatively OK about being left with someone else.  I do see what you're saying, however. My other option would be to wait until next July then stop work entirely, which would allow me to be available to a dog full-time, albeit living on quite a low income.  I'm 53 years old, and following a nasty health scare last year, may have a slightly diminished life expectancy - so I'm eager to adopt a dog as soon as is practical.

Williewingnut - yes, that's Zap.  He's a cracking dog, very handsome and sharp with a relatively good history.  Dogs like him don't turn up very often in rescues.

I'd be glad of any other views - reinforcing Trifan's very helpful insights, or offering a different perspective.

Thank you.
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#17
My thoughts on behavioural issues
With this dog you have seen some, they will need work.
Think about this a puppy needs a lot of work to stop behavioural issues.
So with a older dog you see the problems, unlike the potential issues of a pup.
Now the question is, are you wanting to work on the issues, do you have the resources.
This is not a trick question. I have turned dogs down, I have things I will not take on as problems.
I have deal breakers. Escape artist would be one for instance.
I have things I would take on that would possibly be a deal breaker for others.

So possibly a good start for you in this journey is take a honest hard look at what you can bring in and want to bring in. Also what can you live with and what you definitely can't. Again this is not judgement it is fact.
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#18
(07-16-2017, 03:56 AM)UKPete Wrote:
(07-15-2017, 12:40 PM)Trifan Wrote: I agree with your friend completely. I personally wouldn't even entertain the idea of such an arrangement no matter how experienced the sitter or home boarder is. If employment caused this to be absolutely necessary I might consider it with my two year old who has been with me since 8 weeks but with my twelve month old who has also been with me since 8 weeks, I wouldn't do it no matter how good the sitter was. These are his formative years and consistency is important with any dog let alone a pup who has already gone through an upheaval.

Thank you for your honest and direct reply Trifan - I really appreciate it.  Despite all my research over the last 2 years, I hadn't appreciated that it would take more than a month or so for a dog to be relatively OK about being left with someone else.  I do see what you're saying, however. My other option would be to wait until next July then stop work entirely, which would allow me to be available to a dog full-time, albeit living on quite a low income.  I'm 53 years old, and following a nasty health scare last year, may have a slightly diminished life expectancy - so I'm eager to adopt a dog as soon as is practical.

Williewingnut - yes, that's Zap.  He's a cracking dog, very handsome and sharp with a relatively good history.  Dogs like him don't turn up very often in rescues.

I'd be glad of any other views - reinforcing Trifan's very helpful insights, or offering a different perspective.

Thank you.
I am not against the idea of going to work and using a sitter but also coming home each day. It's more that you will be completely away 3 days each week. So from the pups perspective, who is "his" human ? Who is he actually bonding most with ? In just a few weeks he will barely have had time to settle in let alone truely bond with you. In respect to consistency, this is where it can get messy and confusing for the pup. Everyone needs to be on "exactly" the same page and even subtle differences in how each person handles the pup can delay solid understanding and create confusion.

My son came to stay for a while and within a week totally messed up the simple act of a ball game and how it was played with Max the 2yo. I play with Max and what the heck ? Why is he doing that now ? And I have to retrain and reinforce our game rules. It took Mr smarty pants no time at all to train my son to go to where ever he decided to leave the ball rather than leaving the ball in front of the human. It was always one of Max's quirks right from the start to be creative with returning things. He would return an object and put it into a crate, an open cupboard, in a pot plant, all manner of weird places and then trot off and wait with great anticipation for you to find and retrieve it. He had long since learnt that I wasn't playing that way but ahh here is a new human !!!

Jasper is a very vocal boy and the sounds that come from him are just so adorable but there are sounds or excessive use of sounds that are just not acceptable such as demand barking at his big brother and reactive barking at Max when Max is in high alert but still silent, or when Max goes to his crate when Jasper still wants to play. Oh man, this has been a really hard issue to work with for me. I don't want to quash his vocals, just teach him moderation and restraint. It has taken months to make headway and I am finally getting great results but as soon as there is inconsistency from others it is a step backwards. Even with those living in the home and observing how I go about things, it is hard to get consistency. My partner does OK for ages but then he might be engrossed in something and not following through appropriately. Then it's, Jasper, Jasper, JASPER !!! Meanwhile I am in the kitchen not wanting to be the control freak but slap my palm to forehead and say, "yes his name is Jasper, aaaaaaaand what do you want from him ????" 
At this point in time I wouldn't even leave Jasper with his "dad" for 3 days a week because I have no doubt I would be coming back to square one every week.

I am not saying, don't get this pup but instead to be aware of the importance of consistency with ordinary everyday training let alone specific issues pup might have that are no fault of anyone or anything, just part of who he is. I mean Jasper has been with me since 8 weeks but these issues only popped up a few months ago. If you were to get this pup, perhaps keep a journal of everything about him, your routines and how you deal with things. Basically leaving written instructions for everything LOL
Understand that for many months this will be like a shared custody arrangement with children and each household supervisor does things a little differently which sends mixed messages to kids and dogs alike. He sounds like a great little dog and maybe too good to pass up but go into it with eyes open to the possibilities. You will be a permanent in his life, the sitter won't be but this pup won't have had time to learn that yet. You may have to start afresh once the household has returned to what will be the normal status.
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#19
Trifan and QuirkyDog, I'm sad to say that you have both hit the nail on the head.  It's the overnight stays - often two consecutively - that were bothering me.  The other big issue is that the brilliant dog sitter who could have looked after him on a one-to-one basis isn't well enough to take a dog at the moment.  Combined with the facts that I'm a first time owner and would only have 4 weeks with him before having to board him mean that, as QuirkyDog put it, I don't really have the resources. Sad

So I've just phoned the rescue centre and told them I won't be able to rehome Zap.  I feel sad about it but hopefully he'll find someone who can offer what I can't at the moment and he'll blossom into a lovely dog.

Thank you so much to everyone who offered thoughtful advice and encouragement - I really do appreciate the honesty and experience on this board.  Hopefully (fingers crossed) I'll be able to start looking again early in 2018.

Thanks again.
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#20
I'm sure it was a difficult decision to make. I believe you are doing what is best for Zap. 

I'm confident you will find the right dog for you when the time is right. In the mean time maybe you could voluteer at the shelter and get some experience with dogs until you find the perfect one for you.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

[Image: P1160337-800x600_zps7nxqmgvy.jpg]

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