Solar Eclipse
#11
How cool! Yeah I'm sure the solar eclipse will be spectacular whether or not there's some cloud cover. With lunar eclipses though you won't be so lucky.

Lunar eclipses are fun but then you have to stay up really late to see them. I'm fine with staying up late but getting up the next morning would certainly be tough.
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#12
(08-08-2017, 06:06 AM)Loyal Border Wrote: How cool! Yeah I'm sure the solar eclipse will be spectacular whether or not there's some cloud cover. With lunar eclipses though you won't be so lucky.

Lunar eclipses are fun but then you have to stay up really late to see them. I'm fine with staying up late but getting up the next morning would certainly be tough.

I saw one about 20 years ago in the UK.  It was unforgettable - as the sun started to disappear all the birds suddenly went beserk then when it was gone completely there was silence and coldness.  It was a powerful primal experience in the high street of the town where I was living.
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#13
Everything about it just sounds so strange almost to the point of being completely unimaginable which is partly why I'm so excited.
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#14
I made a mistake in my last post so I edited.  I had a kitten trying to walk on my keyboard and got distracted.   Big Grin

The second solar eclipse I have experienced was when we used the welding helmet.  It was annular eclipse.  Still a great experience but not anywhere as a amazing as a total eclipse.
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#15
Haha, I was wondering about that. The kitten explains a lot. Tongue
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#16
(08-08-2017, 10:08 AM)Loyal Border Wrote: Everything about it just sounds so strange almost to the point of being completely unimaginable which is partly why I'm so excited.

Yes!  It was like the end of the world, and it made me realise right in my guts how much life on earth depends on the sun.  I can see why peoples throughout history have revered the sun.
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#17
TMM, The welding helmet refreshed a childhood memory. We had a solar eclipse when I was a kid and we used my dads welding helmet to watch. No doubt there have been more since however as I have not been in the right place for maximum viewing I haven't gotten too excited. Leading up to the event we made boxes with mirrors in them at school as a project.

UKPete. I remember that eerie feeling as twilight descended in the middle of the afternoon and yes it is understandable that primitive folk interpreted it as a sign from the gods. We have been in the middle of a few cyclones and although it doesn't get dark there is also an eerie silence as the eye passes over. It happens so quickly, one minute huge trees are bending over almost slapping the ground and then nothing but stillness and silence, not a living creature making a single sound.
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#18
It certainly amazes me that these sorts eerie yet spectacular events are even possible in the first place. The specific conditions of everything need to be just right and even so the chances of it happening in a specific location with all the conditions met is rather slim to say the least. The physics behind these storms and eclipse is certainly impressive.
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#19
years ago I was lucky enough to see one. I was working down on te toe of the boot of Louisiana south of new Orleans. me and 3 other guys took dark welding glass and fit them in cardboard and drove a few miles into the shadow. We were surprised when we saw a large crowd gathered but we pulled on to the shoulder of the road and watched the whole thing a experience of a life time. Thinking back I now realize it was the only road in hundreds of miles that was that far south and thats prolly why there was such a crowd of news and science folks there
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#20
That's pretty cool! Too bad we don't have a welding helmet or glass or anything like that... I'll probably just make a pinhole projector.
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