Ringworm
#1
I have a couple of rescues I follow on Facebook and when they get pets with ringworm it seems to be a huge issue getting rid of it. 

In case someone doesn't know ringworm is a fungus and not a worm.

So, does anyone have experience with this?  I got ringworm from a kitten when I was 14 and was horrified thinking I had a worm under my skin (just under my chin).  I didn't have anyone to tell me that it wasn't a worm and was horrified.  I grabbed a few things from the medicine cabinet and applied them to the ugly thing under my chin and it eventually it went away.

Does anyone know why ringworm is such a huge issue in pets?  It wasn't a huge issue with me.  I didn't even know what it was and was still successful in getting rid of it.
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#2
(Yesterday, 08:17 PM)Tasha Wrote: I have a couple of rescues I follow on Facebook and when they get pets with ringworm it seems to be a huge issue getting rid of it. 

In case someone doesn't know ringworm is a fungus and not a worm.

So, does anyone have experience with this?  I got ringworm from a kitten when I was 14 and was horrified thinking I had a worm under my skin (just under my chin).  I didn't have anyone to tell me that it wasn't a worm and was horrified.  I grabbed a few things from the medicine cabinet and applied them to the ugly thing under my chin and it eventually it went away.

Does anyone know why ringworm is such a huge issue in pets?  It wasn't a huge issue with me.  I didn't even know what it was and was still successful in getting rid of it.

Maybe it's such a worry because it is so contagious and can be spread easily on an animal that can't understand, "don't touch".

There is a fungus that causes large rings in turf such as bowling greens and golf courses. They give that a much nicer name, "Fairy Rings". Hmm, much nicer to say you had a Fairy Ring on your chin LOL
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#3
Cats can carry it with no signs, so they can spread it without anyone ever knowing where they got it to keep it from happening again. And it's difficult to treat the whole animal, especially since cats groom themselves and they aren't supposed to eat the meds. So the owner can get it over and over again. Also, some ringworm is resistant to the usual treatments. A friend of mine had a horse that had a ringworm lesion on it's face. She treated it for well over a year before she finally found the right med to get rid of it. But she never contracted that particular ringworm strain.
Gotta love 'em.
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#4
One of my horses had ringworm when I got him, It is tricky to get rid of. Mainly because you have to consistently treat and for longer than you think.
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