How to break an annoying habit ?
#1
Hi all Jura has developed a really annoying habit of nipping Skye when their out especially when their running , sometimes it’s just a touch /nudge  other times hes nipping so hard she’s letting out a squeal , I have tried verbal reprimands which do work but I have to tell him continually to “leave” i was keeping a lead on skye her he was holding on to that instead of nipping her but the lead was getting tangled apart from keeping him on the lead I don’t know what else to do any suggestions greatly appreciated
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#2
You're on the right track with that last thought. HE is the one who should be on the lead, specifically when he nips. Nipping = lead time (meaning can't chase for a few minutes). Let her run around without him for a minute or two, then let him back off. If he goes to nipping again after several days of being persistent with this, or if he gets quicker/harder, it might be arousal / off switch related in which you'll have to help teach him to manage himself (IE, crate time when he gets to nipping away from the action where he can't see it, so he has a chance to calm down).

There are probably other better ideas but this is what comes to my mind without seeing videos and such.
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Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#3
(10-16-2017, 07:56 PM)Ember Wrote: You're on the right track with that last thought. HE is the one who should be on the lead, specifically when he nips. Nipping = lead time (meaning can't chase for a few minutes). Let her run around without him for a minute or two, then let him back off. If he goes to nipping again after several days of being persistent with this, or if he gets quicker/harder, it might be arousal / off switch related in which you'll have to help teach him to manage himself (IE, crate time when he gets to nipping away from the action where he can't see it, so he has a chance to calm down).

There are probably other better ideas but this is what comes to my mind without seeing videos and such.

I think it’s the thrill of the chase they love to run , he’s not being aggressive with her but it’s an annoying habit they play so well together just wish she would retaliate and put him in his place
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#4
Some owners will have their dogs hold a ball or other toy in their mouth because of this. It might work well for him because you said he liked to hold the leash.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#5
(10-17-2017, 04:36 AM)only-borders Wrote: Some owners will have their dogs hold a ball or other toy in their mouth because of this. It might work well for him because you said he liked to hold the leash.

I think he just likes being an annoying little brother who likes pulling hair when he thinks we’re not watching
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#6
That's why leashing when he gets that way might work as well. It will let him know that that behavior makes the fun stop. I have also seen the toy in the mouth help. Some dogs get super mouthy when aroused and when taught to hold a toy will actually go and find that toy when they start feeling themselves getting excited.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#7
It's excitement that leads to natural herding behaviour.
It is easier to stop if you watch and almost see the thought of it, not waiting until the dog has already passed the threshold.
Working on some self control games, particularly involving movement.
I am thinking even building up to flirt pole.
But it is stopping the dog "going there" mentally.
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#8
(10-17-2017, 11:52 AM)Quirkydog Wrote: It's excitement that leads to natural herding behaviour.
It is easier to stop if you watch and almost see the thought of it, not waiting until the dog has already passed the threshold.
Working on some self control games, particularly involving movement.
I am thinking even building up to flirt pole.
But it is stopping the dog "going
He constantly circles her waiting on her to make her move so i think the herding instinct is part of the problem with him , his recall is good so I’ve been calling him back to me the second I think hes going in for a nip no squealing today so that’s been an achievement
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#9
You need to catch this way before the circling, already too late.
You will watch and hopefully see the moment the dog is "triggered".
There will be a more intensity, probably eyes fixed on the target, but mostly I see what I can only describe as a lowering of the body, very slightly you will just sense it, often if you watch the dogs head will slightly lower and slightly slide forward.
At this point you can snap your dog out of this,
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#10
Great assessment and advice Quirky.
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