Should I have Ember's legs/spine checked?
#11
I only asked about deer ticks because of Lymes. A dog can sometime appear to have a limp or shake. The limping can move to different legs also. 
The deer tick is very small and can be missed easily. The bite however shows up like a bullseye on the skin.

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I see what you are describing in the video. Zoe walks very similar to Ember since she has gotten older. She has arthritis in her right rear hip that causes it. She also trembles like Ember in the video due to some weakness. 

One suggestion would be an easy test with some baby aspirin. Give her one with each meal morning and night for 2 or 3 days and see if anything changes in her walk. That dose would be enough to take the edge off if it is arthritis or pain related. If nothing changes then I wouldn't think the way she is walking or trembling is due to any pain.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#12
Hmm I can only see the skin on her belly. I'll see if she'll let me go digging around. In the meantime I will try the aspirin. I'm glad other people see it - I couldn't tell if it was an optical illusion or not since she doesn't really have a limp at all and has never limped or lifted any paw in pain. Also my eyesight isn't the greatest.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#13
We have a preliminary vet appointment tomorrow. Videoing today's sessions with knowing that I wasn't imagining the inward turn allowed me to see a few things. There is a clear, definite hesitation/foot-plant on that right side. We were working on walking over a jump (literally walking over), she decided to jump it twice - and immediately quit the training session.

I have the baby aspirin but was asked by the vet to hold off for a checkup tomorrow.

This girl is expensive but a WHOLE LOT of things right now are finally making sense.

ETA: Here's a video of my realization...


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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#14
I hate to say it, but she looks like she walks with a May West wiggle, which is a sign of hip dysplasia. I hope I'm wrong, because the video isn't great to see what I'm looking for, but I'll be praying for her.
Gotta love 'em.
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#15
What is concerning me is that it might be possible she is switching the turned in foot. So during the walk is was very strongly right sided, but during the second clip (especially around 1:09) to me it looks like her left foot is the one turned in and tucked under.

I agree the video isn't great for diagnosis, but I feel like it does prove that we have a new(ish) legitimate problem to solve.

So we have a vet appointment tomorrow after 3, and I found a traveling animal/human chiropractor that will travel to my home for $50 and do a full adjustment on Ember on Tuesday (assuming Vet doesn't have me cancel that). I don't know how she will like that, but it's cheap, and everyone needs a good adjustment, problem-rear or not. I'll make sure there's lots of decompression time as well as crate rest and dark rooms and spa music and chicken/liver filled kongs galore that day. I don't like the idea of all of this stress on her but I feel like she is SO resilient now, and as long as bringing one of those stressors to the house isn't going to break her fragile brain, I will work to build her back up again.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#16
All of my animals that have had chiro work done figured out really quickly that they LOVED the chiropractor. I think they realized that he made them feel better.
Gotta love 'em.
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#17
Update:

Just got back from the vet, no x-rays. Vet was seeing what I saw yesterday immediately. Then she messed with Ember's legs, and while Ember held her weight well enough on each paw, she fought against having that rear right foot lifted/ touched (but ignored the motions on the left side). So we are dealing with, at the very least, Luxating Platellas (spelling?) on the right, possibly less severely (if at all) on the left. We are on 7 days crate rest and have to use a sling (or I have to carry her) down the steps (2nd floor apartment, yay) with doggie aspirin. This will figure out what our next step is - if X-rays are needed for further information, etc. Thankfully we are fairly sure there is no pain associated, but Ember did NOT like having that back right leg handled. No vocal fuss or or snapping, but she went from still and staring straight ahead to pulling away and looking back at the vet, then around for escape, then tried to get my attention.

Here we are making the absolute most of this that we can. I love 70 degree December days... (half joking, I really want snow for Christmas).

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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#18
Well, I had to watch the video several times to be sure but I would not argue against there being something not quite right with her rear right leg. Not so much pigeon toed on both sides as such, both my boys have a similar movement and I have often found myself watching the back legs and wondering about that ever so slight turn in at times.
To me, that right leg looks just a little bowed by comparison to the left. If it is bowing this might contribute to the pigeon toe effect. There might be something going on with that knee. I know that a torn meniscus (cartilage under the knee cap) caused my knee to bow a little and my partners knee bows from a torn ACL tendon that happened in his youth and was never fixed. A weakness or mild discomfort in the knee might account for her not quite getting that spring when she jumps up.
I mean, this is all speculation and an Xray might shed light on the issue. Don't panic, many of these things can be improved and managed with various therapies once you know what is going on. Bummer about all the stairs, it is a movement that could aggravate a sensitive area as it does put unnatural stresses on the joints and ligaments.
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#19
Keeping my fingers crossed for both of you.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#20
I had a Staffy with a luxating Patella. It started when she was around 5-6 years old. She never needed any serious intervention and it would only play up after certain activities at which time treatment with a single dose anti-inflammatory that always did the trick. She still lived a very active and pain free life. As she became a senior and slowed down generally she simply no longer did the silly things that would aggravate it when she was younger and therefore did not need any treatment at all during her last 5 or so years.

It can be so difficult to capture these things at times as the symptoms can be intermittent. Also the stoic canine often overrides the discomforts when something exciting happens and show no signs of what you might have thought you observed earlier. Fingers crossed that this is an easily resolved or managed issue but I gotta say that you might have to get used to carrying or helping her with stairs to avoid aggravation. You are young and strong, you can always claim credits for it being part of a health and fitness workout LOL
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