Should I have Ember's legs/spine checked?
#31
Pupdate #2: Ember and the Chiropractor

I swear my dog can crunch angrily in another room.

Got Ember adjusted. It is an in home visit, so I felt bad for my poor girl, having her sanctuary invaded, and being held down by Mom while some guy man handles her. Actually, she handled surprisingly well, but also in every way I fully expected - until the end.

Turns out Ember's hips were out of line, her lumbar region was completely out of line, her shoulder was very out of line and several vertebrae in her neck were also out. She also has a massive knotted muscle so thick and so tight that all this time I thought it was part of her shoulder blade.

The back half of her went as expected - some struggle, but with me holder her head, he got a lot done, felt her knees, talked me through everything. Not too bad - not too different from the vet.

When he got to her neck, she LOST IT. I'm talking way worse than anything I've ever experienced with her, and we've had some really bad vet experiences. We actually had to muzzle her (I'm picking up my own probably tomorrow and going to rebuild association with it). I was very pleased with the way I was able to warm her up to it - had her putting her nose into it on her own, mid adjustment, several times as we fought to find the proper size for her. Got it on her and from there on it was a matter of figuring out how to hold her still while still allowing him access to her neck - mean less to say the doctor and I got quite close.

Everything he touched popped or crackled in some way.

As soon as we were done she was trying so hard to get the muzzle off. I calmed her just enough to take it off myself, and as it came off I yelled SNACK! as quickly and excitedly as I could. She already had one foot out the door, but stopped, came back (dancing back and forth in flight mode if Doc so much as moved), snatched the snack out of my hand hard, and darted to the other room.

Commence angry crunching.

We are on another 24-48 hours of downtime, extending to crate rest if she suddenly proves to feel "too good". Also ice and heat for the muscle.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#32
Happy the appointment went better than you expected. Do you have a follow up check with the vet?
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#33
Not yet. I could call them but since his is another week of watching I figured I'd wait and see if they call me first, and if they don't after a week I'll call them.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#34
IDK if the chiro gave you fair warning, but when they have their spine out for a while, muscle memory can pull it back out a few times.
Gotta love 'em.
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#35
He did not, but he did mention that she could quickly undo herself if not careful. I'm supposed to report back Monday and if no change or bad change, then he's coming back that night or the next.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#36
I have a love hate relationship with chiros. Ari spent many hours being adjusted. It gave her short term relief only. They don't understand that by running, jumping on the couch, rolling down hills, etc undo everything the chiro just did. 

Then as GM said muscle memory plays a role as well. In the end what worked best for us was stretching her out before any kind of play or off road hiking. Then when we got home do the same. Everyday I would rub down her spine and massage her legs and body. 

I have an infrared heated light I used on her as well. The combo of the rub downs, stretching  and infrared light worked for her. Only after she turned 10 did I start using baby aspirin on occasion. 

I'm not saying chiros are bad, just don't know if they work as well as we wish they would for our dogs.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#37
It took a full year to get my horse's issues straightened out, but eventually the muscles were retrained. I think it's more of a problem for younger or squirrellier animals than for older or calmer ones.
Gotta love 'em.
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#38
That all makes sense. Ember is not a twisty kind of pup but she could be - I see it in her movements. I'm also not seeing a huge change (she is moving a little bit freer in odd directions like at a backwards angle, but that's about it). She hasn't missed steps in a little while but she's been a good bit slower since the chiro visit. Still watching.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#39
(12-15-2017, 05:44 AM)only-borders Wrote: I have a love hate relationship with chiros. Ari spent many hours being adjusted. It gave her short term relief only. They don't understand that by running, jumping on the couch, rolling down hills, etc undo everything the chiro just did. 

Then as GM said muscle memory plays a role as well. In the end what worked best for us was stretching her out before any kind of play or off road hiking. Then when we got home do the same. Everyday I would rub down her spine and massage her legs and body. 

I have an infrared heated light I used on her as well. The combo of the rub downs, stretching  and infrared light worked for her. Only after she turned 10 did I start using baby aspirin on occasion. 

I'm not saying chiros are bad, just don't know if they work as well as we wish they would for our dogs.

I am 100% on board with your therapy methods. I believe addressing the ligament, tendon and muscle tissues that support the skeletal system is the true key. I know many people believe in chiro's and swear by successes but I am pretty much anti- chiropractics. With my own body being pretty banged up in respect to vertebra, disks and supporting tissues I have had to learn a lot on the subject and now shake my head at myself for the chiro work I pursued once upon a time. It was in fact a visit to a highly well respected chiro that landed me in surgery for 3 collapsed discs in my cervical spine. When disk tissue has broken down all the manipulation in the world will not hold it in place. Oh my goodness, you should see the contraption used to pull the vertebrae back to correct spacing against the incredible strength and pull of the supporting tissues while they fuse them back into correct position.
I am also not a supporter of cold treatment for such things. Yes cold can help inflammation but it also contracts and tightens tissues and restricts blood flow. Heat on the other hand relaxes tissues and enhances blood flow.
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