New Puppy
#1
I know I made a mistake in purchasing this puppy but I did and plan to make it work anyway.  I have been searching for some time for a puppy for my 5 yr. old.  I narrowed the breeds down to the Border Collie, Retriever, and German Shepherd.  I liked the German Shepherds and my son liked the Border Collie.  Both are very active with the German Shepherd being over protective and the Border Collie being somewhat destructive.  I finally decided not to risk my 5 yr. old with the German Shepherd.  I eventually ran across this add for a 12 week old Border Collie with the traditional makings of black and white.  They were in a hurry to sell him so I met them at a service station.  I know these are all red flags.  When I first saw the puppy  he was nasty and timid.  Now he became a rescue puppy.  I paid him and took him directly to my vet. The puppy had worms and mites. I had everything done to him that was needed plus a bath.  When we got home I fed him. He was starving and very thirsty. He is not house trained at all. That was yesterday.  He is a very pretty puppy but very timid.  I feel that he was either mistreated or neglected earlier. At 12 weeks is it possible or probable that I can turn his timidness  around?  If so , how do I go about it?
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#2
My best advice is to read everything you can about fearful/shy puppies. If handled correctly there is no doubt you can turn things around with time and patience. 

Thank you for taking this pup in. You saw he needed help and did the right thing. 

Try to keep him away from all the hustle Christmas can be. Make sure he has a quiet safe spot he can go to. If he comes out on his own praise him for his courage but don't make a big deal out of it. 

He will need some time to settle in and learn your families routine. Give him love and time and I'm sure you will be rewarded with a very loyal friend.

Merry Christmas.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

[Image: P1160337-800x600_zps7nxqmgvy.jpg]

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#3
Yes there were red flags but good on you for taking him anyway, it certainly does sound as though you have rescued him in the true sense of the word.
Shepherds and BC's are both breeds I love and have owned. I would encourage you to let go of preconceived ideas that Sheps can be over protective and BC's destructive. Either can be protective and either can be destructive. Destructiveness is not a trait simply by virtue of being a given breed. It is more associated with a pups needs not being met. Both are intelligent breeds with the BC broadly speaking topping the list. Mental challenges and stimulation satisfies the intelligent mind and really tire a pup out. Physical exercise while necessary will not and a pup who only has physical exercise will catch it's breath and still be board. A board puppy can be a destructive puppy. If not given sufficient mental stimulation it will make it's own.

Being sensitive can be a BC trait, it is part of the skill set of this herding breed and part of what makes them so outstanding at their job. This little guy at only 12 weeks is just a baby and given what you have described god only knows what he has experienced in the short 4 weeks since he left his mum and litter mates. Given that he has only been with you since yesterday, it is to be expected that he will be unsure, lack confidence, be timid or even quite fearful. Let him settle in, show him he is safe and receiving consistent love and care, show him he has reason to feel a little more confident. Give him a week or so to become a little more comfortable with his new home and family before you start presenting him with new experiences, people, places, etc.

Socialisation is critical with any pup and particularly the shy/timid ones. Socialisation IS NOT a trip to the dog park or similar to play with other dogs. It is the introduction to ALL things he might encounter in his life, people, animals, places, noises, objects and equipment, cars, mowers, vacuum cleaners etc, etc the list is endless. Plan socialisation, don't just throw him in the deep end. Take it gently and be happy with small steps and successes, always ending on a high note. Don't be tempted to ask for more too quickly just because he is doing OK.

Being timid can be by nature or by nurture or by both but it absolutely can be worked on with great success. It's about time, patience and consistency. My oldest was a very timid boy, fair enough to say quite fearful. He has come along beautifully and is a delightful boy. Everybody who meets him loves and indeed wants Max. Being timid is in his DNA so although he generally does not now exhibit timid/fearful behaviours there are from time to time situations that might cause him to default to such behaviours. For example: on a recent vet visit a new nurse came towards him with too much excitement and Max pee'd himself a little (he is 2 1/2).To rectify any angst he may have been left with in respect to vet visits, I take him in at least once a week and weigh him on the scales in the waiting room. I asked the staff to ignore us, don't speak to hi, look at him or acknowledge him in any way. After 6 or so visits I asked them to just lean of the counter and say "hi Max, good boy". Now when we enter he is looking for the nurse to say "hi Max" nad is trying to walk around the counter to make contact.

While there are some generalisations with all dogs and then specific breeds, they are all different in the same way every human is different. Being timid is just one aspect of who he is and you absolutely can help him learn to be comfortable with who he is.

With your son only being 5, make sure you teach him respectful handling of the pup, he is not a toy. Seek out brain games for dogs, there are many books, internet articles and FB groups to help with this. DO NOT scold or punish him. Reward with treats and/or verbal praise ALL behaviours that are desirable and ignore or distract and redirect for unwanted behaviours. It is so easy to take wanted behaviours for granted and not think to reward. Example: if pup is just chilling out, show him that being calm is rewarded. When I have pups, my pockets ALWAYS have treats in them for the first year LOL because there are endless opportunities in every day to show the pup that what is happening in any given moment is desirable and appreciated.

Re: toilet training. Take him outside every 30 min or so and also watch for sniffing around which indicates he might want to go. When he toilets where you want him to, praise him/treat him as though he just laid a golden egg. Do not scold for accidents, just ignore and clean it up. The more effort you put into taking him out in order to catch that opportunity for reward, the sooner he will catch on. Some dogs learn quickly and others can take quite a while.

Please show us some photo's of your new boy and I look forward to following your progress.
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#4
(12-21-2017, 12:50 PM)Trifan Wrote: Yes there were red flags but good on you for taking him anyway, it certainly does sound as though you have rescued him in the true sense of the word.
Shepherds and BC's are both breeds I love and have owned. I would encourage you to let go of preconceived ideas that Sheps can be over protective and BC's destructive. Either can be protective and either can be destructive. Destructiveness is not a trait simply by virtue of being a given breed. It is more associated with a pups needs not being met. Both are intelligent breeds with the BC broadly speaking topping the list. Mental challenges and stimulation satisfies the intelligent mind and really tire a pup out. Physical exercise while necessary will not and a pup who only has physical exercise will catch it's breath and still be board. A board puppy can be a destructive puppy. If not given sufficient mental stimulation it will make it's own.

Being sensitive can be a BC trait, it is part of the skill set of this herding breed and part of what makes them so outstanding at their job. This little guy at only 12 weeks is just a baby and given what you have described god only knows what he has experienced in the short 4 weeks since he left his mum and litter mates. Given that he has only been with you since yesterday, it is to be expected that he will be unsure, lack confidence, be timid or even quite fearful. Let him settle in, show him he is safe and receiving consistent love and care, show him he has reason to feel a little more confident. Give him a week or so to become a little more comfortable with his new home and family before you start presenting him with new experiences, people, places, etc.

Socialisation is critical with any pup and particularly the shy/timid ones. Socialisation IS NOT a trip to the dog park or similar to play with other dogs. It is the introduction to ALL things he might encounter in his life, people, animals, places, noises, objects and equipment, cars, mowers, vacuum cleaners etc, etc the list is endless. Plan socialisation, don't just throw him in the deep end. Take it gently and be happy with small steps and successes, always ending on a high note. Don't be tempted to ask for more to quickly just because he is doing OK.

Being timid can be by nature or by nurture or by both but it absolutely can be worked on with great success. It's about time, patience and consistency. My oldest was a very timid boy, fair enough to say quite fearful. He has come along beautifully and is a delightful boy. Everybody who meets him loves and indeed wants Max. Being timid is in his DNA so although he generally does not now exhibit timid/fearful behaviours there are from time to time situations that might cause him to default to such behaviours. For example: on a recent vet visit a new nurse came towards him with too much excitement and Max pee'd himself a little (he is 2 1/2).To rectify any angst he may have been left with in respect to vet visits, I take him in at least once a week and weigh him on the scales in the waiting room. I asked the staff to ignore us, don't speak to hi, look at him or acknowledge him in any way. After 6 or so visits I asked them to just lean of the counter and say "hi Max, good boy". Now when we enter he is looking for the nurse to say "hi Max" nad is trying to walk around the counter to make contact.

While there are some generalisations with all dogs and then specific breeds, they are all different in the same way every human is different. Being timid is just one aspect of who he is and you absolutely can help him learn to be comfortable with who he is.

With your son only being 5, make sure you teach him respectful handling of the pup, he is not a toy. Seek out brain games for dogs, there are many books, internet articles and FB groups to help with this. DO NOT scold or punish him. Reward with treats and/or verbal praise ALL behaviours that are desirable and ignore or distract and redirect for unwanted behaviours. It is so easy to take wanted behaviours for granted and not think to reward. Example: if pup is just chilling out, show him that being calm is rewarded. When I have pups, my pockets ALWAYS have treats in them for the first year LOL because there are endless opportunities in every day to show the pup that what is happening in any given moment is desirable and appreciated.

Re: toilet training. Take him outside every 30 min or so and also watch for sniffing around which indicates he might want to go. When he toilets where you want him to, praise him/treat him as though he just laid a golden egg. Do not scold for accidents, just ignore and clean it up. The more effort you put into taking him out in order to catch that opportunity for reward, the sooner he will catch on. Some dogs learn quickly and others can take quite a while.

Please show us some photo's of your new boy and I look forward to following your progress.

Thanks for the advice.  I will post his photos....
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#5
Good on you! Definitely a rescue situation! No judgement here - only thanks!

My girl was about 1.5 years when I rescued her, she is about 3.5 now. She is (really, was) fearful, was shut down when I got her. If you have any questions feel free to ask. We've come a really long way and she is blossoming finally.

The biggest piece of advice I have for you is don't rush anything. You have a puppy, and you have at least 1 if not 2 fear periods that are going to come up. Every 3 steps forward will probably have a step back - that is all part of the process! Be patient, and don't let worry or anxiety travel down the leash (deep breaths!). Journal everything you work on (I highly suggest videoing - most of our last 2 years are on my Youtube account). If he doesn't come around really soon, you'll start to feel like nothing is working - that feeling is a perfect reminder to go back and watch videos of where you WERE.

He is very young and has a lot of learning to do. You may have no trouble at all, or it may turn into a long process. Both aspects have their own rewards. It will take some time for the pup to settle in. Trifan's advise is perfect. I'm going to add that with socialization, try not to do too much with food. You don't want to distract the dog from the novel things you are introducing them too, or the introductions will mean nothing in the long run. Let the dog just explore and experience and reward at the end.
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Gotcha Day: November 14, 2015
Vet-Listed Birthday: May 2, 2014
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#6
(12-21-2017, 02:24 PM)Ember Wrote: Good on you! Definitely a rescue situation! No judgement here - only thanks!

My girl was about 1.5 years when I rescued her, she is about 3.5 now. She is (really, was) fearful, was shut down when I got her. If you have any questions feel free to ask. We've come a really long way and she is blossoming finally.

The biggest piece of advice I have for you is don't rush anything. You have a puppy, and you have at least 1 if not 2 fear periods that are going to come up. Every 3 steps forward will probably have a step back - that is all part of the process! Be patient, and don't let worry or anxiety travel down the leash (deep breaths!). Journal everything you work on (I highly suggest videoing - most of our last 2 years are on my Youtube account). If he doesn't come around really soon, you'll start to feel like nothing is working - that feeling is a perfect reminder to go back and watch videos of where you WERE.

He is very young and has a lot of learning to do. You may have no trouble at all, or it may turn into a long process. Both aspects have their own rewards. It will take some time for the pup to settle in. Trifan's advise is perfect. I'm going to add that with socialization, try not to do too much with food. You don't want to distract the dog from the novel things you are introducing them too, or the introductions will mean nothing in the long run. Let the dog just explore and experience and reward at the end.

Thank you.  I do feel good about him. I feel it will take time...
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#7
One thing would be first and foremost in my mind with all the crazy. No matter what  I personally in this situation I prefer to take him out on leash potty calmly. Same spot. To prevent one less confusion and accidents during hectic schedule. It will help his confidence once he learns that. And less frustration for me. inconvenient as it seems.  If I am busy I set a timer. Giving him his own small safe space in the house when not supervising him will not only give comfort but less area to use as a toilet.Other than that I would just let him be himself. Take things in in his own way while keeping him safe and comfortable.
“If having a soul means being able to feel love and loyalty and gratitude, then animals are better off than a lot of humans.”

James Herriot
― 
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#8
Please post photos.  My Mattie is like Ember.  I adopted Mattie from a rescue when she was around 1.5 years old and is now almost 4.  When I first brought Mattie home she was terrified of anyone that came to visit.  When strangers came to the house she would pee all over herself and run and hide.  Tonight she greeted two new people (family visiting for the holidays) without a puddle on the floor and was bugging them for attention within a few minutes.  As was said in the above posts.  Don't rush the process.  Tasha was my fist Border Collie and she is afraid of thunder storms, fireworks, and wind storms.  I adopted Mattie and she wasn't afraid of Tasha's three fears but was afraid of everything else.... the blender, the doorbell, shaking out clothing from the dryer, shaking out the plastic liner for the kitchen garbage... the list went on and on and on.  I was worried that Mattie would never live a normal life.  But we made progress.  One tiny step at a time.

Do you have a crate?  My dogs have always had a crate and it is their safe spot.  When I had young children I taught them that when the dog was in the crate they were to never bother the dog. Training your young son to not bother the puppy when in the crate will teach your dog that when things are too scary or busy that the puppy can go to the crate and know they will be left alone.  Also, crates are great for keeping your puppy out of trouble when they can't be supervised.  And when you have other children over, if your puppy seems overwhelmed, you can crate him.  Having a dog think that their crate is their sanctuary is really helpful for training. 

Make sure the whole family is involved in training.  My daughter is 15 and we often discuss what cue we will use. With everything we train I want both our dogs to respond to the same cue.  When you want your puppy to lie down what do you say?  "Down", "Lie down", "Platz".  For my collies it is "Platz" because my now gone German Shepherd was trained in a few commands in German and I wanted to have one word for a command for all the dogs.  It doesn't matter what word you use.  What matters is the everyone is on the same page and is consistent.

Have you decided on a name?
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#9
(12-22-2017, 03:32 AM)Tasha\s&Mattie Wrote: Please post photos.  My Mattie is like Ember.  I adopted Mattie from a rescue when she was around 1.5 years old and is now almost 4.  When I first brought Mattie home she was terrified of anyone that came to visit.  When strangers came to the house she would pee all over herself and run and hide.  Tonight she greeted two new people (family visiting for the holidays) without a puddle on the floor and was bugging them for attention within a few minutes.  As was said in the above posts.  Don't rush the process.  Tasha was my fist Border Collie and she is afraid of thunder storms, fireworks, and wind storms.  I adopted Mattie and she wasn't afraid of Tasha's three fears but was afraid of everything else.... the blender, the doorbell, shaking out clothing from the dryer, shaking out the plastic liner for the kitchen garbage... the list went on and on and on.  I was worried that Mattie would never live a normal life.  But we made progress.  One tiny step at a time.

Do you have a crate?  My dogs have always had a crate and it is their safe spot.  When I had young children I taught them that when the dog was in the crate they were to never bother the dog. Training your young son to not bother the puppy when in the crate will teach your dog that when things are too scary or busy that the puppy can go to the crate and know they will be left alone.  Also, crates are great for keeping your puppy out of trouble when they can't be supervised.  And when you have other children over, if your puppy seems overwhelmed, you can crate him.  Having a dog think that their crate is their sanctuary is really helpful for training. 

Make sure the whole family is involved in training.  My daughter is 15 and we often discuss what cue we will use. With everything we train I want both our dogs to respond to the same cue.  When you want your puppy to lie down what do you say?  "Down", "Lie down", "Platz".  For my collies it is "Platz" because my now gone German Shepherd was trained in a few commands in German and I wanted to have one word for a command for all the dogs.  It doesn't matter what word you use.  What matters is the everyone is on the same page and is consistent.

Have you decided on a name?

Thanks. He is doing a little better each day.  I don't have a crate yet but I plan to get one today. No definite name yet.  We call him Buddy as a nick name until our son names him. We live in the country so he will spend much time outdoors. For now he doesn't like to come to us but he will follow us.  The first day or so he wouldn't bark or acknowledge us at all.  Now he likes to be held and will howell when something is not to his pleasing. We are already attached to him...
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#10
Update :  His name is officially Buddy.  When Buddy was first rescued, he weighed 13.5 lbs., was flea, mite, and worm infested. He was very timid for the first 3 days. He has totally adjusted.  After 3 weeks , he weighs 21.5 lbs. and according to the Vet is very healthy.  He plays very well with my son as they are both very active.  We are still trying to potty train him but with the cold weather it has been a little difficult. We also have a very big 9 year old tom cat that he wants to make friends with but Max, the cat, will not have any of it.
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