Classic problems....
#31
I am back with a few Questions and Statements.

IF flops over hard..from standing to laying by just simply falling over sideways...no brace for impact just slams into the ground..IF has also done this with me when im lovin on her,kids say she does it alot when she lies down on the beds.Is this normal ish?

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I am glad i got a BC for a companion...they really are quite unique.
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#32
We have a dog who does this.....we try and ignore her when she does (she doesn;t pay any attention to the surface or what might be underneath her)

She is worse if she gets attention for it, and she doesn't do it so often anymore, however, if you look at her for too long without touching her she will collapse. We call them Silly saffy moments!
Hannah
The only mistakes my dogs make are the ones I've taught them!
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#33
They're not falling down. Their flopping and it's a trait among BCs. Surra was so good at it people thought he was hurt when we would walk in and he would just crash to the floor. Even Jin does it.

As for training times. I've always trained before playtime and sometimes about an hour after meals. For class instruction I wold like to suggest training at about the same time everyday and do not train at home. Go outside or to the park.
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#34
Tassle thanks for all the tips! I just discovered the site after searching for a week and this has the most info. I will read all of your suggestions but for now have a few general questions and observations.

history:
I got 2 BC pups from a shelter (litter of 6) at 4 months of age.
Both female.
At over 7 months both are house trained and sit for rewards.
Neither are socialized.
One is more responsive than the other but will follow the less responsive one takes off next store.

Concerns:
I have property with a pond and take them for runs (chasing, tackling each other and sniffing). Concern: the pond is frozen and in spring will thaw. When in the chase/high excitation mode, they ignore any command.
If they fall through the ice, will they be able to pull themselves out?
If they jump onto the ice and it breaks close enough to shore, can they swim to shore?
I've noted that they don't like open water near the ice (we had a January thaw), and they stopped at the water's edge, responding somewhat to a command to get away from it, but not coming to me.

They love to roughhouse and tumble after one knocks the other over on a full run.
Is this something I should stop and consider it fighting (growling, bitting without hurting like when they were 4 mos.)? Again, when in this mode, they run like the wind chasing each other, ignoring commands until they quiet down.
Should I be worried about squirrels, rabbits etc. in spring and the fact that they may run off the property to chase them, not coming back?

I've used the prong (pinch) collar with good results. Both can walk side-by-side on my left after I take one off one dog. I believe the dog without the prong collar realizes there can be no mutual play-attack when one is subdued.
Was this a good approach to the constant play attacks while on a leash and constant pulling?

Four of my youngest five grandkids are short and the dogs will jump on them. They also jump on me when I get home. Socialization and training will take time.
Any quick time suggestions?

I use Frontline for tick control. Seems to do the job.

Baths? I bought some Hartz shampoo because they have an odor when wet. (worse when pups) Is okay to bath them once or twice a year?

One is fatter (44 lbs), the other 38 lbs. Should I be concerned and put one on a diet?Two bowls allow one to eat the others left over food.

I feed them Premium dry dog food. Is dry food okay without soft food?
No table scraps; carrots for treats, apples (fruit in general), lettuce, nuts, dog cookies (dental grade supposedly).
Are smoked pig ears alright? the love them to chew on. Raw hide rarely, but the big knuckles allow only very small pieces to be bit off.

Cut and paste any recommendations.

Thanks
Frank
Montgomery, NY
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#35
senkosam Wrote:Tassle thanks for all the tips! I just discovered the site after searching for a week and this has the most info. I will read all of your suggestions but for now have a few general questions and observations.

history:
I got 2 BC pups from a shelter (litter of 6) at 4 months of age.
Both female.
At over 7 months both are house trained and sit for rewards.
Neither are socialized.
One is more responsive than the other but will follow the less responsive one takes off next store.

Concerns:
I have property with a pond and take them for runs (chasing, tackling each other and sniffing). Concern: the pond is frozen and in spring will thaw. When in the chase/high excitation mode, they ignore any command.
If they fall through the ice, will they be able to pull themselves out?
If they jump onto the ice and it breaks close enough to shore, can they swim to shore?
I've noted that they don't like open water near the ice (we had a January thaw), and they stopped at the water's edge, responding somewhat to a command to get away from it, but not coming to me.

I personally would not want to risk it - you live there you know the place best - but if you are not watching you cannot help if something does go wrong.

They love to roughhouse and tumble after one knocks the other over on a full run.
Is this something I should stop and consider it fighting (growling, bitting without hurting like when they were 4 mos.)? Again, when in this mode, they run like the wind chasing each other, ignoring commands until they quiet down.
Should I be worried about squirrels, rabbits etc. in spring and the fact that they may run off the property to chase them, not coming back?

Yes

I've used the prong (pinch) collar with good results. Both can walk side-by-side on my left after I take one off one dog. I believe the dog without the prong collar realizes there can be no mutual play-attack when one is subdued.
Was this a good approach to the constant play attacks while on a leash and constant pulling?

Personally I am not a fan of Prong collars - I like to teach my dogs how to behave not force them there with pain.


Four of my youngest five grandkids are short and the dogs will jump on them. They also jump on me when I get home. Socialization and training will take time.
Any quick time suggestions?

I use Frontline for tick control. Seems to do the job.

Baths? I bought some Hartz shampoo because they have an odor when wet. (worse when pups) Is okay to bath them once or twice a year?

One is fatter (44 lbs), the other 38 lbs. Should I be concerned and put one on a diet?Two bowls allow one to eat the others left over food.
You should be able to feel the ribs with a slight covering - if you cannot then they are overweight. HOwever - just becasue they are sisters does not mean that they will weigh exactly the same ...to each his own and all that


I feed them Premium dry dog food. Is dry food okay without soft food?
No table scraps; carrots for treats, apples (fruit in general), lettuce, nuts, dog cookies (dental grade supposedly).
Are smoked pig ears alright? the love them to chew on. Raw hide rarely, but the big knuckles allow only very small pieces to be bit off.
Yes - treats are fine - as to your food - I am in the UK not the US so do not know what is reccommended as a 'good' food - however - most of mine are on dried alone
Cut and paste any recommendations.

Thanks
Frank
Montgomery, NY

Ok - your biggest problem (from what you are describing) comes from the fact you have litter sisters. All training needs to be done seprately. In the UK this is a major no-no - litter mates is a very difficult thing to deal with due to teh fact the bond with the mate is far stronger than the bond with any human.
Hence all training should be done seperately - if you have one that is behaving and one that is not during a training session, how do they know which is being praised and which is being reprimanded??

I would find a good training class and start working on developing a bond with each of them individually.

Re the playing - if you are concerned I would get a professional in to observe. It is a fine line between playing and fighting - and with bitches you never want it to turn to a fight.

Good luck with your pups.
Hannah
The only mistakes my dogs make are the ones I've taught them!
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#36
Thanks.
Individual training sounds better than getting both on track at the same time.

We will have to monitor the food situation.

The prong collar has rubber tips and doesn't seem to cause any pain, just the "sensation of the mother holding the pup by the neck". Surging and fighting while walking hasn't responded to rewards.
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#37
My puppy Eden is 13 weeks old now and she does know a few commands, she can sit, lie down, stay, stand, paw, target, and do a brief "watch me".

But I feel like I've come to a stand still in her training, I've been trying like mad to get her to learn heel but it just isn't clicking with her. Am I starting to teach her this too soon? Should I wait on it? What typically happens is she is too interested in the food at first, which i hold in my left hand by my side. She will jump on my arm, scratch, run in front of my hand, just about anything BUT walk beside me. After a few similar attempts she becomes uninterested in the food altogether.

I'm at a loss.
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#38
Blossom87 Wrote:My puppy Eden is 13 weeks old now and she does know a few commands, she can sit, lie down, stay, stand, paw, target, and do a brief "watch me".

But I feel like I've come to a stand still in her training, I've been trying like mad to get her to learn heel but it just isn't clicking with her. Am I starting to teach her this too soon? Should I wait on it? What typically happens is she is too interested in the food at first, which i hold in my left hand by my side. She will jump on my arm, scratch, run in front of my hand, just about anything BUT walk beside me. After a few similar attempts she becomes uninterested in the food altogether.

I'm at a loss.

I would say at 13 weeks old you are teaching a hell of a lot. Take it slow and make sure she understands,

Re - Heel...depends on what you are wanting - loose lead walking or competition style Heelwork?
Hannah
The only mistakes my dogs make are the ones I've taught them!
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#39
Competition style heel work, but if it's still too soon then when would be a good time to teach this?

I've read a plethora of obedience and training books and none of them really specify a specific age for training so I figured it best to ask people who have the experience.
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#40
With Siren I did not bother teaching the actual heel in motion, just the position I wanted her to be in. I used a hand touch. and built up so she would remain still in that position and learnt to hold it.

When she was confident I then moved on to walking -but just a few steps.

I don;t tent to use food to lure them, but just the hand target, then click/treat when they have held it for as long as I want.

I would suggest you look at Joanna Hill's stuff - she is great at teaching motivational obedience.

Siren working at 1st (and only) obedience comp last year
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Hannah
The only mistakes my dogs make are the ones I've taught them!
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