Foods & Plants Dangerous to Dogs
#1
Dangerous Foods to Avoid

Grapes and Raisins

Poisonous Plants

Yep, rhododendrons are on there, so stop that little rascal "If" from chewing those too!

Hope this helps a bit!
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#2
Chocolate toxicity Top
Chocolate contains theobromine, a compound that is a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic.

When affected by an overdose of chocolate, a dog can become excited and hyperactive. Due to the diuretic effect, it may pass large volumes of urine and it will be unusually thirsty. Vomiting and diarrhoea are also common. The effect of theobromine on the heart is the most dangerous effect. Theobromine will either increase the dog’s heart rate or may cause the heart to beat irregularly. Death is quite possible, especially with exercise.

After their pet has eaten a large quantity of chocolate, many pet owners assume their pet is unaffected. However, the signs of sickness may not be seen for several hours, with death following within twenty-four hours.

Cocoa powder and cooking chocolate are the most toxic forms. A 10-kilogram dog can be seriously affected if it eats a quarter of a 250gm packet of cocoa powder or half of a 250gm block of cooking chocolate. These forms of chocolate contain ten times more theobromine than milk chocolate. Thus, a chocolate mud cake could be a real health risk for a small dog. Even licking a substantial part of the chocolate icing from a cake can make a dog unwell.

Semi-sweet chocolate and dark chocolate are the next most dangerous forms, with milk chocolate being the least dangerous. A dog needs to eat more than a 250gm block of milk chocolate to be affected. Obviously, the smaller the dog, the less it needs to eat.


Onion and garlic poisoning Top
Onions and garlic are other dangerous food ingredients that cause sickness in dogs, cats and also livestock. Onions and garlic contain the toxic ingredient thiosulphate. Onions are more of a danger.

Pets affected by onion toxicity will develop haemolytic anaemia, where the pet’s red blood cells burst while circulating in its body.

At first, pets affected by onion poisoning show gastroenteritis with vomiting and diarrhoea. They will show no interest in food and will be dull and weak. The red pigment from the burst blood cells appears in an affected animal’s urine and it becomes breathless. The breathlessness occurs because the red blood cells that carry oxygen through the body are reduced in number.

The poisoning occurs a few days after the pet has eaten the onion. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions and/or garlic. Left over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness.

Onion poisoning can occur with a single ingestion of large quantities or with repeated meals containing small amounts of onion. A single meal of 600 to 800 grams of raw onion can be dangerous whereas a ten-kilogram dog, fed 150 grams of onion for several days, is also likely to develop anaemia. The condition improves once the dog is prevented from eating any further onion

While garlic also contains the toxic ingredient thiosulphate, it seems that garlic is less toxic and large amounts would need to be eaten to cause illness.


The danger of macadamia nuts Top
Macadamia nuts are another concern. A recent paper written by Dr. Ross McKenzie, a Veterinary Pathologist with the Department of Primary Industries, points to the danger of raw and roasted macadamia nuts for pets.

The toxic compound is unknown but the affect of macadamia nuts is to cause locomotory difficulties. Dogs develop a tremor of the skeletal muscles, and weakness or paralysis of the hindquarters. Affected dogs are often unable to rise and are distressed, usually panting. Some affected dogs have swollen limbs and show pain when the limbs are manipulated.

Dogs have been affected by eating as few as six macadamia kernels (nuts without the shell) while others had eaten approximately forty kernels. Some dogs had also been given macadamia butter.

Luckily, the muscle weakness, while painful, seems to be of short duration and all dogs recovered from the toxicity. All dogs were taken to their veterinary surgeon.

Pets owners should not assume that human food is always safe for pets. When it comes to chocolate, onions, garlic and macadamia nuts, such foods should be given in only small quantities, or not at all. Be sure that your pets can’t get into your stash of chocolates, that food scraps are disposed of carefully to prevent onion and garlic toxicity and that your dog is prevented from picking up macadamia nuts if you have a tree in your garden.



Other potential dangers Top
Pear pips, the kernels of plums, peaches, apple core pips (contain cyanogenic glycosides resulting in cyanide posioning)
Potato peelings and green looking potatoes
Rhubarb leaves
Mouldy/spoiled foods
Alcohol
Yeast dough
Coffee grounds, beans & tea (caffeine)
Hops (used in home brewing)
Tomato leaves & stems (green parts)
Broccoli (in large amounts)
Raisins and grapes
Cigarettes, tobacco, cigars
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#3
Another I found....


Items to avoid Reasons to avoid
Alcoholic beverages Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.

Baby food Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to dogs. (Please see onion below.) Can also result in nutritional deficiencies, if fed in large amounts.

Bones from fish, poultry, or other meat sources Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system.

Cat food Generally too high in protein and fats.

Chocolate, coffee, tea, and other caffeine Contain caffeine, theobromine, or theophylline, which can be toxic and affect the heart and nervous systems.

Citrus oil extracts Can cause vomiting.

Fat trimmings Can cause pancreatitis.

Grapes and raisins Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys. There have been no problems associated with grape seed extract.

Hops Unknown compound causes panting, increased heart rate, elevated temperature, seizures, and death.

Human vitamin supplements containing iron Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.

Large amounts of liver Can cause Vitamin A toxicity, which affects muscles and bones.

Macadamia nuts Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.

Marijuana Can depress the nervous system, cause vomiting, and changes in the heart rate.

Milk and other dairy products Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.

Moldy or spoiled food, garbage Can contain multiple toxins causing vomiting and diarrhea and can also affect other organs.

Mushrooms Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.

Onions and garlic (raw, cooked, or powder) Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.

Persimmons Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.

Pits from peaches and plums Can cause obstruction of the digestive tract.

Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves; potato and tomato stems Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems. This is more of a problem in livestock.

Raw eggs Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.
Raw fish Can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death. More common if raw fish is fed regularly.

Salt If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.

String Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."

Sugary foods Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.

Table scraps (in large amounts) Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; COOKED bones should not be fed.

Tobacco Contains nicotine, which affects the digestive and nervous systems. Can result in rapid heart beat, collapse, coma, and death.

Yeast dough Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.

ETA::

Chewing gum. This is a relatively new player in the world of pet poisons. Not all chewing gum is toxic. However, several popular brands contain a sweetener called xylitol. Xylitol can cause dangerously low blood sugar in dogs. It also has been linked to liver damage.
I recommend that pets never be allowed access to any poisons. However, please be especially careful with the three listed above. Dogs are more likely than cats to be exposed to each of these poisons because they are less selective about what they eat.

If you suspect that your pet has consumed any poisonous product, contact a veterinarian immediately. Acting quickly can help to prevent serious consequences.

If possible, always bring the packaging from the product that was consumed, as well as any remaining product to the veterinarian’s office when you seek treatment. This will help the vet to positively identify the type and amount of toxin consumed.

Remember, however, that the best way to keep your pet safe from poisons is to make sure he or she does not have access to them in the first place.
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#4
http://answerpool.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f...2151084611
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#5
a few more toxic and deadly plants(some maybe listed on other replies but some i know are not to be found.

Atamasco lily
Bitter Sneexeweed
Black Cherry
Black Locus
Black Nightshade
Bladderpod
Bracken Fern
Buckeye
Buttercup
Castor Bean
Cherry Laurel
Chinaberry
Coffee Senna
Commomn BUttonbush
Common Cocklebur
Common Sneezeweed
Common Yarrow Crtolaria
Eastern Baccharis
Fetterbush
Great Laurel
Hairy Vetch
Hemp Dogbane
Horsenettle
Jimsonweed
Johnsongrass
Lantana
Leucothone catesbaei
Maleberry
Mexican Poppy
Milkweed
Mountain Laurel
Mustard
Oleander
Perilla Mint
Poison Hemlock
Poison Ivy
Poison Oak
Poison Sumac
Pokeberry
Rattlebox
Red Buckeye
Redroot Pigweed
Rosebay
Sesbania
Sctch Broom
Sheep Laurel
Showy Crotalaria
Sicklepod
Spotted Water Hemlock
St. John Wort
Stagger Grass
Sweet Clover
Sweetshrub
White Snakeroot
Yellow Jessamine
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#6
XYLITOL is not just in chewing gum anymore. It is used in alot of sugarless products (even baked goods). It is sometimes used with another sweetner also.
We almost lost Lucky to xylitol. He was a 75lb. border collie/lab mix. He ingested 2 sticks of Stride gum. I called the vet immediately. We were instructed to rush him to the emergency clinic. They had to induce vomiting. He brought up the gum (and the wrappers) but it was too late. He had already started suffering effects. He spent 52 hours in the hospital getting IV's and bloodwork. Luckily he survived but it was an awful ordeal for him. While we were at the clinic with him for the weekend 2 other dogs came in with xylitol poisoning. One had no effects and was sent home within a few hours. The other, sadly, passed away.
I had never heard of xylitol or what it could do to a dog before this happened or we would never would have had any product containing xylitol in our house.
Kelly
In their short lives our pets give us all they can...their friendship, unselfish love, and total loyalty. Lucky dog always in my heart
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#7
Green's Mom Wrote:XYLITOL is not just in chewing gum anymore. It is used in alot of sugarless products (even baked goods). It is sometimes used with another sweetner also.
We almost lost Lucky to xylitol. He was a 75lb. border collie/lab mix. He ingested 2 sticks of Stride gum. I called the vet immediately. We were instructed to rush him to the emergency clinic. They had to induce vomiting. He brought up the gum (and the wrappers) but it was too late. He had already started suffering effects. He spent 52 hours in the hospital getting IV's and bloodwork. Luckily he survived but it was an awful ordeal for him. While we were at the clinic with him for the weekend 2 other dogs came in with xylitol poisoning. One had no effects and was sent home within a few hours. The other, sadly, passed away.
I had never heard of xylitol or what it could do to a dog before this happened or we would never would have had any product containing xylitol in our house.

That's scary. I wasn't aware of xylitol. Thanks for the heads up! I see LadyDaniela had edited it into her post but I totally missed it.
Brandon
Lance & Mick

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#8
It is amazing to me that you don't hear more about xylitol and how toxic it is to dogs. From what I read online there is not enough evidence to say if all animals have the same reaction. It was so scary to see Lucky like that. I spent 52 hours in that clinic and watched a dog die from xylitol poisoning. I just sat and cried with the owner. It could have been Lucky if he wasn't a larger dog and we didn't act quickly. I had called the vet to ask if the gum would hurt him.
When Lucky came home I emailed our local news and newspaper and urged them to run a story/article about the danger of xylitol. I said please, please contact the clinic my dog was in and make people aware of this danger. Not one did.
I tell everyone I know who has a dog. A few weeks after Lucky came home one of the other teachers at our school had her dog ingest gum with xylitol. She had read the article I sent her online but a friend had gum and her dog got into it. Because she was aware, she rushed her dog to the vet and he was fine.
Even our groomer didn't know about it. She found an article online and posted it right on her door to make all her clients aware.
I shop at Wegman's and there are notices all around the aisles where the dog food is about xylitol. I spoke to the manager and wrote to the company to commend them for making people aware and for caring about dogs enough to do that.
If everyone tells someone, maybe we can save some dogs.
Kelly
In their short lives our pets give us all they can...their friendship, unselfish love, and total loyalty. Lucky dog always in my heart
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#9
Good for you in getting the word out about Xylitol. Another good reason not to give dogs premade or packaged people food. You never know what can be hiding in it.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#10
Wow...these much food should be avoided? I'll definitely monitor my dogs' diet. Thanks for these information!
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