Cross Breed Collies
#11
(07-30-2010, 02:20 PM)ThoughtfulGhost Wrote: After reading this, i completely understand what you have said, and did not know they were in fact called mutts. Thank you for changing my mind and pointing my views in another direction (:

And i do agree, the personality of your dog is all you need to look for Big Grin

If the parents of a dog are registered breeds, they are no longer called 'mutts', but hybrids.  Some people call them Designer Dogs and there is even some sort of a registry for some of them. 

Aren't new breeds made this way, mixing two breeds from the same classification of dog, such as mixing two breeds of sheep dogs over time, trying to combine certain characteristics?

Aussies came about during the western expansion from the mixing of Border Collies from some indigenous dog of the American west.  Great result, I must say!  (They were originally called American Shepherds.)

To me, a mutt is a dog of more than two breeds, or a dog of unknown parentage.  They are often wonderful dogs, and I have heard they can also be more durable than some pure breeds.
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#12
Research by Scott and Fuller
Clearly found breeding a purebred with a different purebred produced very different dogs in looks and temperament. In fact the further these were bred down from the F1s. (The cross breed bred with the cross breed without breeding back to one of the parent breeds). The more unpredictable it became not only in the litters but within a litter.
Yes all recognized breeds did start off as mixing dogs. But to be recognized the breed must fit a standard. Usually the working breeds will not necessarily be clones but are recognizable.
Designer breeds do not meet this criteria. There is only one way a standard can be set and that is a lot of in breeding from the founding dogs. Each breed can trace its ancestry back to a couple of dogs.

I always feel sad that mutts are seen as less of a dog. I have known and owned mutts and they have been amazing dogs.
However I do not like designer breeds for several reasons. They are money makers and in some cases i believe some crosses should not happen either physically or mentally.
I have witnessed some cross breeds that are in conflict. The 2 breeds were very different and did not blend. One that really sticks out was a blue tick coonhound cross with a blue healer. Beautiful looking dog but a dog that was psychologically in conflict.
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