How I deal with Biting/Mouthing
#21
Just came looking for this thread to deal with Barney. Chi pups have sharp teeth!
Kelly
In their short lives our pets give us all they can...their friendship, unselfish love, and total loyalty. Lucky dog always in my heart
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#22
M
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#23
Milo does this every now and again when he gets excited, so we just give him a time out in the kitchen till he is calm again.

He also jumps up an bites during a walk (normally when we are crossing thr road) which is a pain so now before we cross the road we make him sit then give him a treat just before we cross so he is busy eatin that while we walk across the road, or if he does it on the park we just stop and hold him away (as best u can on a retractable lead) till he stops and sits then carry on with the walk
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#24
I wish I'd seen this thread when ash was much littler! Ash has always nipped - main,year me. Wegot him at 7.5weekks, i suspect he could have done with another week with his mum and litter. We asked advice of lots of people, loud yelps did Not work, finally ignoring started to, but by then it had become a habit. Then ash got ill and started nipping in pain or fear. Again, habit made. Now at 13 months we're having to work really hard against it- it's working - it seems the line that makes him nip has moved further along, but its still there. I get bruises on The back of my arms.

I've done endless research but find nearly all information is on prevention by stopping it early, not what to do when it's,become a habit.

We find ignoring works, deflecting into a command, and giving ash a toy stick to carry which occupies his mouth.however he recognises places he should have his toy now, and when he doesn't have it that's sometimes enough to make him jump and nip!

We're definitely going in the right direction, it happens much much less now,but any further advice is always appreciated Smile
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#25
When Luna first started giving biting us a go a friend told us to make a yelping noise - this worked really well for us!

Except I can make the noise a lot better than my husband, haha - so he tends to stick with a 'no' and redirection to appropriate behaviour.
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#26
This is really interesting, thanks for the advise. My 5 month old puppy Jett likes to chew on our sofa at the moment and I will be picking her up in future for a time out.

I have noticed recently that she likes to sit next to me where she can get access to my hand and just put her mouth around my hand or fingers and just sit there like that, no biting. She does it with her own paw sometimes and her back leg, she would sit there for ages like that if i left her to, has anybody else experienced this with their puppy?
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#27
This sounds weird, but that's good. She's practicing bite inhibition. None of my BCs every did this, but it was pretty common with my GSDs.
Gotta love 'em.
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#28
'Gideon\'s mom''','index.php?page=Thread&postID=182578#post182578 Wrote:This sounds weird, but that's good. She's practicing bite inhibition. None of my BCs every did this, but it was pretty common with my GSDs.
Aaah I see, it has never occurred to me that it could be this, thanks for pointing it out Smile
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#29
We have this problem with Whiskey. He loves to bite in play or when we are just trying to settle down. Also walking around the house he can nip the back of our legs when he isnt getting attention or he doesnt want us to leave the room. We got to the stage where he was coming out of it, always making sure in play he bit the toy and not us, but my other halfs children seem to love to encourage him to bite their clothes and them. I know they are kids and they just want to have fun with him, but I feel like Im the bad guy for telling them off for it. I also feel sorry for whiskey as we tell him off but then hes encouraged when they come and visit. This 2 different rules situation has lead to him ignoring us most of the time when we tell him off. He will have an arm in his mouth and just carry on biting because he thinks we may change our mind about how much we like it. SFun_duh2
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#30
I am sorry it is rough when people are not on the same page. But if they are not ....things like this can go very badly possibly. This is where I HAD to lay down the law. Children old enough to understand were shown how to play and told what was not okay. They were always under my close supervision. They are told what happens if they encourage unwanted behavior. If they allow or encourage an unwanted behavior .....puppy is removed. The puppy is not at fault here. The children need to be reminded and play time over for a while. Use them as training helpers by getting them involved they will learn positive interaction. Training is fun!!!!! Kids love to be helpers. Give them titles for the job. It will build a positive mutual respect between kids and dog. Everyone gets on same page. Less confusion means dog learns faster. Someone however does have to step up and SET THE LEAD in the situation. First thing I would show them is chewing or grabbing is NOT okay. And why. If they have a problem accepting it or remembering it...you can tell what type of maturity level you are working with and hopefully what capacity they are ready to "help" It is not bad guy to stop all interaction if it comes to everyone's safety and not just in that moment. Puppies grow big and strong a twenty pound DOG chewing on them won't be so fun to them in several months.

Of course if they are older kids like my fourteen year old there is a completely different approach to this.
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