Training Info 2 years and over
#1
Add your videos and helpful info.
Linda

One Border Collie Is Never Enough

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#2
Recall

I recommend, if you get a puppy to start right away by playing hide and seek with your pup. It is fun for both of you and they love the reward of finding you.

Have been working on recall with Silky (she was almost 2 years old when I adopted her), I am pleased to announce, "by Jove, I think she's got it". We went to some horse trails today and she was 100% on her returns to me. She even came and stood beside me when some riders came by on their horses, they gave many compliments on how well trained she is. (puff puff for both of us) She did start to take off with a jogger who slowed to compliment, but returned when I gave a quick whistle. I have been so patient with her and it has finally paid off.

What I did/ how she got it:

find woods or hiking trails in parks (at times when I knew there wouldn't be a lot of people/ other dogs--rainy, cold days) take her on the lead then give her the touch command while standing still and holding my hand down to my left side

allowed her to run/ get ahead of me far enough that I would step behind a tree or sit behind a rock/log, so when I whistled she wouldn't see me when she looked (she was always in my site)

When she couldn't see me, she came running back and I would step out say "touch" and give her loads of praise (she is NOT food motivated) I would then tell her go ahead and repeat every 5 or so minutes. When we would get close to the end of the walk I would do the same thing but put her back on her leash.

In the beginning there were "incompletes" (I don't call it failure, just all part of the process), especially with an older dog (not one you've had since a baby.

We both had a fantastic day and she is truly physically and mentally tired. Physically from running so much (obviously) mentally from all of the new smells and sites...and many touches.

I will try to get video to show how she does.
Nature is cruel, but we don't have to be. -Temple Grandin
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#3
I thought this might be helpful to some folks who have a dog with 'protective aggression' dog like Athena.

http://www.bcrescue.org/protective.html
Gabby, Athena, & Trout
The best handler in the world is the one whose dog is having the most fun.

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#4
(01-10-2012, 06:46 PM)youngK9 Wrote: I thought this might be helpful to some folks who have a dog with 'protective aggression' dog like Athena.

http://www.bcrescue.org/protective.html

Oh no Sad -
Quote:You have to face off an aggressive dog and ensure that you don't get bit. You have to gain physical control over the dog and then continue to manipulate them (touch their ears, their tummy, their feet, etc.) until they submit and finally give in, realizing that it's inevitable. This is not for the faint-hearted or untrained (ever see the "Crocodile Hunter" guy on Animal Planet that catches deadly snakes with his bare hands? It's basically the same thing. :-)

This is a very dangerous thing to suggest to people. Its a very good way of getting bitten. I would urge people to look at methods to teach the dogs to accept handling in pleasant ways rather than forcing the issue.

As this guy says later - doing this is no guarantee that the dog will not try the snapping with someone else. Teaching the dog that handling is pleasant is a much better way of ensuring that, because the dog learns to enjoy the handling rather than just to tolerate it.
Hannah
The only mistakes my dogs make are the ones I've taught them!
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#5
Tassle1,'index.php?page=Thread&postID=101539#post101539 Wrote:This is a very dangerous thing to suggest to people. Its a very good way of getting bitten. I would urge people to look at methods to teach the dogs to accept handling in pleasant ways rather than forcing the issue.
I agree and disagree. I think you do have to stand up to them, but sometimes standing up to them is simply not backing down, rather than pushing forward. The difficulty is getting the happy medium. If you just back down, they're right, the dog knows they can get what they want with that behaviour, but just forcing them is dangerous.
My friend's dog is a protective dog, and I did a version of this, by trying to pet his stomach. However, rather than forcing it on him I went to the point where he just started showing aggression and discomfort, then I held my position until he relaxed again. After that I continued to reach towards him until he started being aggressive again and waited. I continued this, slowly getting closer and closer until I could touch him, at which point I gave him a slow and gentle touch and once he got used to it I backed off. So I was forcing the dog to submit to what I wanted, but without moving too fast and endangering my safety. It can be a long process, but the dog just needs to know that s/he can trust you to be in his/her personal space.
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#6
I disagree. If the dog is showing any signs of aggression at all then you've pushed them too far, too fast.
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#7
Jewels,'index.php?page=Thread&postID=142282#post142282 Wrote:I disagree. If the dog is showing any signs of aggression at all then you've pushed them too far, too fast.
As much as I can understand that point of view, how does that apply to dogs who have been rescued from traumatic situations? Also, what counts in your mind as a sign of aggression?


I met a gorgeous greyhound mix who would, practically unannounced, bite at people who tugged at his collar; a behaviour which is a product of mistreatment from previous owners. It would make it exceedingly difficult as an owner to take the poor guy on walks. So how does someone help him overcome his fear without triggering any signs of aggression?

I have also seen people who let their dogs get away with murder, and if the dog thinks it's in charge you can also have aggression. Scapa bit me once when I went to pick up her food bowl (when she was about 3 months). I gave her a wee pinch on the ear and took the food away for a while until she sat calmly and waited again. I repeated the "taking the food away" manoeuvre several times so that she could learn the appropriate behaviour. She never did it again and does not show signs of fear when I come near her while she eats. I have even had other people go near her and pick up her bowl while she is eating, to ensure that she is comfortable with others as well. She had no problem, she didn't even blink an eye and now she has no food possessiveness. However, I fear if I hadn't attempted to take her food away and let that behaviour continue, it could have become a far bigger issue, but attempting that got me bitten (not terribly though, I hasten to add). So I understand what you mean, but I don't think it's always so black and white.
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#8
Clearly we come from very different schools of thought. I would never pinch a dogs ear or give any other kind of physical punishment to teach it a lesson. I would never remove a dog's food bowl as a means to prevent food aggression either. I use positive reward based methods only. Using a positive trainingapproach is not about letting your dog get away with things, it is about preventing behaviour issues which can occur at the hands of negative reinforcement methods (like those used by the like s of Cesar Milan, or simply misinformed owners who haven't been aware of the progression in training that has taken place over the last 30 years).
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#9
Jewels,'index.php?page=Thread&postID=142639#post142639 Wrote:Clearly we come from very different schools of thought. I would never pinch a dogs ear or give any other kind of physical punishment to teach it a lesson. I would never remove a dog's food bowl as a means to prevent food aggression either. I use positive reward based methods only. Using a positive trainingapproach is not about letting your dog get away with things, it is about preventing behaviour issues which can occur at the hands of negative reinforcement methods (like those used by the like s of Cesar Milan, or simply misinformed owners who haven't been aware of the progression in training that has taken place over the last 30 years).
I agree.

Scapaflow: I am glad to hear that the pinching of the ear didn't seem to have any negative effects on your dog from what you say, but you're rather lucky that it didn't in my opinion. Punishing a dog in that way could have easily caused the dog to have issues with having certain parts of him/her touched... whether it would cause the dog to be aggressive when that part of their body is touched, or if they get anxious or shy away.

If I repeatedly was pinched in the ear, I don't reckon I'd want people coming close to my ears with their hands.

Anyway, I feel that the most important goal to have when owning and training a dog is to develop TRUST between you and the dog. Physically punishing the dog in anyway does not seem like an efficient way to build trust.

Just my opinion.
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